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From a woman who has been there and back, the first inside look at the devastating effects evangelical Christianity’s purity culture has had on a generation of young women—in a potent combination of journalism, cultural commentary, and memoir. In the 1990s, a “purity industry” emerged out of the white evangelical Christian culture. Purity rings, purity pledges, and purity b From a woman who has been there and back, the first inside look at the devastating effects evangelical Christianity’s purity culture has had on a generation of young women—in a potent combination of journalism, cultural commentary, and memoir. In the 1990s, a “purity industry” emerged out of the white evangelical Christian culture. Purity rings, purity pledges, and purity balls came with a dangerous message: girls are potential sexual “stumbling blocks” for boys and men, and any expression of a girl’s sexuality could reflect the corruption of her character. This message traumatized many girls—resulting in anxiety, fear, and experiences that mimicked the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder—and trapped them in a cycle of shame. This is the sex education Linda Kay Klein grew up with. Fearing being marked a Jezebel, Klein broke up with her high school boyfriend because she thought God told her to, and took pregnancy tests though she was a virgin, terrified that any sexual activity would be punished with an out-of-wedlock pregnancy. When the youth pastor of her church was convicted of sexual enticement of a twelve-year-old girl, Klein began to question the purity-based sexual ethic. She contacted young women she knew, asking if they were coping with the same shame-induced issues she was. These intimate conversations developed into a twelve-year quest that took her across the country and into the lives of women raised in similar religious communities—a journey that facilitated her own healing and led her to churches that are seeking a new way to reconcile sexuality and spirituality. Sexual shame is by no means confined to evangelical culture; Pure is a powerful wake-up call about our society’s subjugation of women.


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From a woman who has been there and back, the first inside look at the devastating effects evangelical Christianity’s purity culture has had on a generation of young women—in a potent combination of journalism, cultural commentary, and memoir. In the 1990s, a “purity industry” emerged out of the white evangelical Christian culture. Purity rings, purity pledges, and purity b From a woman who has been there and back, the first inside look at the devastating effects evangelical Christianity’s purity culture has had on a generation of young women—in a potent combination of journalism, cultural commentary, and memoir. In the 1990s, a “purity industry” emerged out of the white evangelical Christian culture. Purity rings, purity pledges, and purity balls came with a dangerous message: girls are potential sexual “stumbling blocks” for boys and men, and any expression of a girl’s sexuality could reflect the corruption of her character. This message traumatized many girls—resulting in anxiety, fear, and experiences that mimicked the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder—and trapped them in a cycle of shame. This is the sex education Linda Kay Klein grew up with. Fearing being marked a Jezebel, Klein broke up with her high school boyfriend because she thought God told her to, and took pregnancy tests though she was a virgin, terrified that any sexual activity would be punished with an out-of-wedlock pregnancy. When the youth pastor of her church was convicted of sexual enticement of a twelve-year-old girl, Klein began to question the purity-based sexual ethic. She contacted young women she knew, asking if they were coping with the same shame-induced issues she was. These intimate conversations developed into a twelve-year quest that took her across the country and into the lives of women raised in similar religious communities—a journey that facilitated her own healing and led her to churches that are seeking a new way to reconcile sexuality and spirituality. Sexual shame is by no means confined to evangelical culture; Pure is a powerful wake-up call about our society’s subjugation of women.

30 review for Pure: Inside the Evangelical Movement That Shamed a Generation of Young Women and How I Broke Free

  1. 4 out of 5

    Canadian Reader

    Klein’s book about the “purity movement” and sexual shaming of girls within the powerful evangelical community in the U.S. may focus on a worthy enough subject, but the writing is so pedestrian and hyperbolic that I felt no desire to persist beyond the very lengthy 34-page introduction. I’ve read my share of undergraduate papers and this book put me in mind of them in spades: clumsy prose, unnecessary repetition, and the sloppy use of quotations from witnesses and supposed “experts” (Brené Brown Klein’s book about the “purity movement” and sexual shaming of girls within the powerful evangelical community in the U.S. may focus on a worthy enough subject, but the writing is so pedestrian and hyperbolic that I felt no desire to persist beyond the very lengthy 34-page introduction. I’ve read my share of undergraduate papers and this book put me in mind of them in spades: clumsy prose, unnecessary repetition, and the sloppy use of quotations from witnesses and supposed “experts” (Brené Brown, for example) that illustrate no particular point very well. From the little I read, was convinced that investing any more time in warmed-over social science thesis material would be foolish.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Thanks to Touchstone and Netgalley for this ARC. I grew up on the fringes of purity culture. It wasn’t part of my religious upbringing, but I was pretty well acquainted with the movement as a teen in the 90’s. Mostly I mocked it, as I did most things associated with the Christian Right in those days. Only after reading Klein’s compassionate and empathetic book do I realize how wrong I was to write off purity culture as some innocuous chastity craze. It has left deep scars on thousands? Millions? Thanks to Touchstone and Netgalley for this ARC. I grew up on the fringes of purity culture. It wasn’t part of my religious upbringing, but I was pretty well acquainted with the movement as a teen in the 90’s. Mostly I mocked it, as I did most things associated with the Christian Right in those days. Only after reading Klein’s compassionate and empathetic book do I realize how wrong I was to write off purity culture as some innocuous chastity craze. It has left deep scars on thousands? Millions? Only God knows how many lives. As a practicing Christian, I am appalled by the lack of love shown in this movement, just as I have been appalled when reading about the experiences of former Christian culture “insiders” like Vicky Beeching and Jennifer Knapp. There is this attitude of “us” versus “them,” an exclusivity I cannot reconcile with the Gospel Jesus preached. And the shame that haunts so many adherents of this movement! It is unfathomable to me that this guilt and shame has its roots in a cultural phenomenon that is supposed to be about waiting for “True Love.” Maybe it’s maturity or maybe after reading story after story of how negatively True Love Waits etc have impacted the lives of so many of my generation, I do not find this chastity craze funny anymore. It angers me. It disappoints me. It disheartens me. But it doesn’t make me laugh.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    I didn't grow up evangelical, but I completely understand this purity culture and I'm glad people like Klein are writing about it. The purity myth is another great book on the same theme. I did not love the format of the book--I wanted to hear more in Klein's voice, more history of the movement, and more data or commentary. Instead, Klein just interviews a lot of ex-evangelicals and then reproduces the interviews almost verbatim. Some are very interesting and some just felt too long. I really li I didn't grow up evangelical, but I completely understand this purity culture and I'm glad people like Klein are writing about it. The purity myth is another great book on the same theme. I did not love the format of the book--I wanted to hear more in Klein's voice, more history of the movement, and more data or commentary. Instead, Klein just interviews a lot of ex-evangelicals and then reproduces the interviews almost verbatim. Some are very interesting and some just felt too long. I really liked the way she identifies a sort of post traumatic stress syndrome or a neural wiring that links sex with shame in these cultures and how that can effect girls for their entire lives. I would have loved more data or expert commentary on that than what is provided.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Touchstone Books

    Wow. Shocking, deeply empathic, and meticulously researched, Pure exposes a terrifying phenomenon in this country—one that affects us all, evangelical or not.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    This book is sad on two levels. 1. The traumas experienced by so many women and the fact that distortion of Christian doctrine led to their abuse and/or struggles, in many cases driving them away from the church. 2. The fundamental misunderstanding of Christianity demonstrated by the author. Reading this, my heart hurt for the women who were physically and emotionally manipulated and abused, even as I winced through the unnecessarily graphic details of sexual exploits that indicated their "freed This book is sad on two levels. 1. The traumas experienced by so many women and the fact that distortion of Christian doctrine led to their abuse and/or struggles, in many cases driving them away from the church. 2. The fundamental misunderstanding of Christianity demonstrated by the author. Reading this, my heart hurt for the women who were physically and emotionally manipulated and abused, even as I winced through the unnecessarily graphic details of sexual exploits that indicated their "freedom" from the twisted vision of sexuality promoted in their evangelical upbringings. The author repeatedly presents a false dichotomy between an oppressive, legalistic, and unbiblical view of women with a self-gratifying, love-is-love view of women that is even more unbiblical. It's a lose/lose situation. True Christianity is lost in the tug-of-war between the author's unfair depictions of "conservative Christianity" and "progressive Christianity." However, I do think it's important that we discuss sexuality in healthy, God-honoring ways. Treating it as dirty, unnatural, shameful, etc. is harmful and wrong. It's important to understand how the overemphasis on purity has hurt people (especially women) and distorted the Gospel. While I never experienced half of what is described in these pages, I grew up in a church that devalued women in practice, leading to my own difficulty understanding femininity and accepting the role God placed me in as a woman. I appreciate the author's honesty and openness is discussing a deeply personal topic; there are many quotes I noted for "relate-ability" or for further thought. There is definitely a conversation to be had here, but it needs to be set within God's framework instead of our own.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Julia Graf

    The subject matter is interesting but the writing is so stiff and basically just a transcript of her interviews. I was expecting more insight and conclusions from this book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    I received this book as an advanced reader's copy due to the requests and reviews from our patrons and from goodreads and this book was very powerful in the message that it conveyed. This "movement" impacted a lot of people and made a strong difference in not only that community but worldwide. I was hit hard with a whirl of emotions and disbelief that this strong view had such a strong impact on people. The book displayed some heartfelt stories, shocking revelations and important life lessons th I received this book as an advanced reader's copy due to the requests and reviews from our patrons and from goodreads and this book was very powerful in the message that it conveyed. This "movement" impacted a lot of people and made a strong difference in not only that community but worldwide. I was hit hard with a whirl of emotions and disbelief that this strong view had such a strong impact on people. The book displayed some heartfelt stories, shocking revelations and important life lessons that we all tend to forget. Very influential and our readers will benefit which is why we are giving it 5 stars!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ali Shaw

    I was raised in an evangelical community that HHS’s subscribed to purity culture. I lost count of the times while reading this book I felt relief and horror that other people had the same feelings and experiences I did. The book is well written, well researched and well paced. Highly recommend. I couldn’t put it down.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Robert D. Cornwall

    As I finished reading Pure, the U.S. Senate was concluding a day long hearing pitting the memories/claims of a previously obscure woman and the nominee for a life-time appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court. The two may be different at one level and yet related at another. In the Senate hearings, the question was, who will you believe? Too often down through the ages, we believe the man and not the woman. Could it be that we have different expectations for women than men. If a woman is found to b As I finished reading Pure, the U.S. Senate was concluding a day long hearing pitting the memories/claims of a previously obscure woman and the nominee for a life-time appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court. The two may be different at one level and yet related at another. In the Senate hearings, the question was, who will you believe? Too often down through the ages, we believe the man and not the woman. Could it be that we have different expectations for women than men. If a woman is found to be sexually "impure," which might mean simply being at a party and drinking, then we shouldn't be surprised when something untoward occurs. In other words, if something happened, then it must be her fault. If she flirts or wears a particular kind of clothing, then she might be "asking for it." Time after time we've heard that line, both from politicians and from pulpits. "Pure" takes us inside a movement that is widespread within evangelicalism that elevates sexual purity to such a high level that it ends up damaging women's lives. The author of this book, Linda Kay Klein grew up within this context. The books is part autobiography, but just as important it is based on multiples of interviews both with friends and others who were directed her way. They tell their stories to the author, who then relays them to us. The book is at points graphic, but how can we deal with issues sexuality and not expect to encounter rather graphic stories. She tells of a movement that emerged in the 1980s and 1990s that taught in youth groups and from pulpits the importance of remaining sexually pure. The goal was virginity till marriage. The message given to young women was that if they failed to live up to this standard they would be unwanted by men. Their marriage prospects would be damaged, because -- and this was a common metaphor -- who wants chewed gum. Not only should a young woman not engage sexually, but she should not engage in any sexual thoughts. These are unbecoming to woman. There was another message given. Young women should beware of being "stumbling blocks" to men. She confesses that this warning, about being a stumbling block, was annoying to her as a junior high student who wanted desparately to please God. The message she heards was that she and her friends "were nothing more than things over which men and boys could trip." (p. 3). Over time the Purity movement became big business, with purity rings, books, clothing, and more. Among the buyers of these products was the government, as apparently $2 billion dollars of federal money has been expended to support abstinence-only programming. She notes that this money has been distributed to "community-based organizations, faith-based organizations, local and/or state health departments, and schools." Only California did not accept federal funding for abstinence-only education programming. Churches, of course, made use of this material as well. The movement has had a listing influence on the lives of women, for as Klein writes "the purity movement teaches that every sexual activity---from masturbation to kissing if it elicits tha special feeling--- can make one less pure" (p. 12). In other words, if a woman becomes aroused, that is inappropriate. As for guys, well it's a different story, I guess. The book is composed of four movements, three of which have four chapters. The final movement has three. The first movment focuses on the four purity culture stumbling blocks: First, if the purity culture doesn't work for you, then you must be the problem, not the movement. Second is that girls and women must conform to particular gender roles to be acceptable to men. Third, unmarried girls and women are to "maintain a sexless body, mind, and, and heart to be pure." This becomes difficult once a woman marries, because now she is expected to turn on her sexuality to please her husband. Fourth, there is the "systematic mishandling of sexual abuse cases and survivors (the topic of the current Supreme Court nomination process). These chapters are challenging and unsettling, but those of us who have some experience within the evangelical sub-culture recognize elements of this story to be true to our own experience. Movements two and three focus on the stories that emerge out of these four stumbling blocks, both inside and outside the church. Klein brings to us stories of women who faced shame and some ultimately leaving the church. She also shows how some broke free of the messaging both inside and outside the church. The fourth section brings some closure, showing how people have moved beyond these stumbling blocks. As she notes, in each section she begins with her own story. Although I came of age within an evangelical subculture that predates the Purity Movement as it emerged in the 1980s, I can see many of the precursors emerging in my own experience. I remember the messaging we got. We were told to be sexually pure, but we struggled with that. Keep your minds clean and clear. While we were told masturbation was wrong, apparently it was widespread among my male friends. As for my female friends, that wasn't a topic to which I was privy. I do know that the girls were constantly told to be careful so as not to be a stumbling block. Apparently we were of weak minds and spirits, and thus the girls in our group needed to be careful with how they dressed. I remember going to camp and the girls had to wear t-shirts over their swim suits, even if they were one-piece suits. Our experiences might have presaged what came later, but it does appear that the messaging became more unbearable and destructive as it became not only a religious thing, but a business. There were no purity rings that I remember. I believe that Linda Kay Klein has done us an important favor by telling this story. Not only because it uncovers an evangelical subculture, but uncovers a culture that holds women to a different standard from men, and seems to encourage disbelief when women share stories of embarrassment, abuse, assault, and rape. After all, they must have done something to warrant it. By shining a light on this subculture, she shines a light on our culture as a whole. Women are not stumbling blocks. They need not feel shame about their bodies or their sexuality. It's time for us to have the difficult conversations that might enlighten us all. I say this as one who has struggled myself with these questions. She writes stories about women as a way of liberation from shame. She calls the church to account, not to destroy faith, but to restore it. Thanks be to God.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie Merrifield

    (more in-depth review available at stefaniethelibrarian.wordpress.com) The cover of this book says it all, "Inside the Evangelical Movement that Shamed a Generation of Young Women and How I Broke Free." Linda Kay Klein grew up in the evangelical church during the height of the purity movement. She spent 12 years interviewing friends, and strangers, who grew up in the same environment. During this time she was able to confirm her belief that she wasn't alone in, to be over-simplistic, sexual shame (more in-depth review available at stefaniethelibrarian.wordpress.com) The cover of this book says it all, "Inside the Evangelical Movement that Shamed a Generation of Young Women and How I Broke Free." Linda Kay Klein grew up in the evangelical church during the height of the purity movement. She spent 12 years interviewing friends, and strangers, who grew up in the same environment. During this time she was able to confirm her belief that she wasn't alone in, to be over-simplistic, sexual shame. Klein presents a group of individuals who all struggled with aspects of their sexuality and its relationship with their ideas of themselves, Christianity, and God. Initially I was surprised by Klein's inclusion of the book I Kissed Dating Goodbye by Joshua Harris in her research. IKDG wasn't pushed in my church like it was in Klein's and some of her interviewees' churches, but it had a lasting effect. And not a positive one. It was eye-opening that so many had been damaged and broken by people using this book as some sort of all-encompassing rule book. True Love Waits is the movement/culture/program I remember most vividly. Not only do I remember, I bought myself a TLW ring to wear after one overly devastating breakup in my late teens, early twenties (at least as devastating as it could be for a 19-20 year old). I was all "I'm married to Jesus now, y'all," as I held my left hand up like I had some fancy engagement ring.  The church differentiates between regular sin and sexual sin. Regular sin is something we do that is wrong, sexual sin is something we do that makes us wrong. The first causes guilt ("I did something bad"), the second causes shame ("I am bad"). By the time a Christian female is allowed to have sex (as she is now married...to a man), her brain has been rewired to view sex and shame as the same thing. Klein discusses this concept with one of her interviewees, Jo, who is quoted as saying, "Somehow you have to be a lamb - chaste and pure as the driven snow until you're married. And then you have to be a tigress in the bed. The vows make that instant transformation somehow." She goes on to say, "...if you don't satisfy him, he will have an affair, or he has a right to chastise you for not being amazing in bed...because you are responsible for his sexual satisfaction and whether his eyes wander." I could go on, but I want you to read the book, I want you to see what's wrong and strive to change.  Overall, I chose to give this book a 4/5 because of writing style - not because of subject matter. It read more like a dissertation than a standard book. The introduction was too long for my taste - though I enjoyed the subject matter. Klein's use of dialogue and magazine-esq interview surrounding descriptions often pulled me away from the content, rather than keeping me focused. I changed from reader to writer in these circumstances, using my imaginary purple pen (cause red is so blah) to strike through unnecessary and distracting text. 

  11. 4 out of 5

    Heather Yockey

    A weekend read. Once I started, I couldn’t put down. Mainly because of the stories, each page reminding me of a world that’s a long ways back in my rear view mirror. Wondering if 12 years ago, when I was much more a part of these circles would I have had the guts to read this book. If you are a white woman who has grown up in this subculture, chances are you’ll find yourself in one of the many stories included in this book. Strict home? Hippy parents? Obedient? Rebellious ? The writer noted all A weekend read. Once I started, I couldn’t put down. Mainly because of the stories, each page reminding me of a world that’s a long ways back in my rear view mirror. Wondering if 12 years ago, when I was much more a part of these circles would I have had the guts to read this book. If you are a white woman who has grown up in this subculture, chances are you’ll find yourself in one of the many stories included in this book. Strict home? Hippy parents? Obedient? Rebellious ? The writer noted all interacted with the teachings differently, but all were affected. I appreciated the straightforward, fair approach and uncovering how the internalization of the message mattered. Be prepared for PTSD or perhaps it’s RTSD. Every page is true. While the stories are epically sad, I am so glad this author took the long road, and stayed with this project. Every time I invest time in looking back it’s exhausting as I unearth something that may take years to mine. She gave a sense of the cost in this book. I appreciated how she shared the truth of her family interactions. She didn’t sugar coat living present day - as though it’s all magically worked out. She didn’t “evangelicalize” it - which is rare even when writing a book about leaving.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    If you grew up evangelical, or in any kind of religiously-based purity culture, your psyche probably really needs this book. It gets a little repetitive now and then, but the perspective is invaluable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    This book moved me to tears numerous times, as I read the stories of people whose lives were profoundly harmed by the Purity movement. But the book really speaks to cultural shaming of all kinds, even outside Christianity, and its message can be appreciated by everyone regardless of a person's faith tradition. The journeys told in this book are often harrowing and sad, but they often are also redemptive and hopeful, in that people who have been damaged by cultural shaming can find their way to a This book moved me to tears numerous times, as I read the stories of people whose lives were profoundly harmed by the Purity movement. But the book really speaks to cultural shaming of all kinds, even outside Christianity, and its message can be appreciated by everyone regardless of a person's faith tradition. The journeys told in this book are often harrowing and sad, but they often are also redemptive and hopeful, in that people who have been damaged by cultural shaming can find their way to a true "purity" that sustains within.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carrie Surbaugh

    At points this was painful to read, seeing my experience of purity culture reflected in the stories of so many other people. However, the book was structured well and offered some hope for redemption of the evangelical church’s (really messed up) sexual ethic.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    Difficult to read because, even having been raised Catholic, it hit extremely close to home. I've heard similar stories from several friends. Linda has uncovered something huge and real and devastating here, and we should all pay attention.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Greene

    The best part of this book is the lengthy introduction, which is available on NPR.org, so you don't have to bother with the rest of it. I grew up with a youth group similar to Klein's and received much of the same well meaning but ridiculous education. She does an amazing job exposing the problems with the cult of virginity and pointing out the long lasting shame that this kind of education can induce. My biggest take away the the importance of sound doctrine and a biblical foundation for these The best part of this book is the lengthy introduction, which is available on NPR.org, so you don't have to bother with the rest of it. I grew up with a youth group similar to Klein's and received much of the same well meaning but ridiculous education. She does an amazing job exposing the problems with the cult of virginity and pointing out the long lasting shame that this kind of education can induce. My biggest take away the the importance of sound doctrine and a biblical foundation for these issues. Without that, we are left with a wrong understanding of God's purposes and our bodies, scare tactics, shaming, and bizarre object lessons with chewed pieces of gum and roses stripped of petals. And no wonder an abstinence only education among evangelical youth hasn't proven to reduce STDs or sexual encounters when compared to other forms of education. The church often does not teach what it should regarding why we believe what we believe about sex. I truly sympathize with the author and those she interviewed, especially those who were truly wronged or abused by the church and the purity movement's teachings. I also hate the fact that so many evangelical churches have very little foundation for what they teach, so when it back fires, there is nothing to fall back on. My real problem with this book are Klein's conclusions and suggestions for how to fix these problems. The solution for all of this is not changing to an all inclusive, universalist church like the author suggests. Real hope and truth is found only in one place, and no true healing can come apart from it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Valli

    I grew up in the independent Christian church/Church of Christ, and though I managed by a combination of luck and apathy to never attend a True Love Waits retreat or sign a single purity pledge, I was well-versed in purity culture. It has deeply affected me and the other women I grew up with; I have seen it contribute to and cause sexual dysfunction, self-esteem issues, relationship struggles, and religious identity problems. This book tells many of those stories, giving voice to a generation of I grew up in the independent Christian church/Church of Christ, and though I managed by a combination of luck and apathy to never attend a True Love Waits retreat or sign a single purity pledge, I was well-versed in purity culture. It has deeply affected me and the other women I grew up with; I have seen it contribute to and cause sexual dysfunction, self-esteem issues, relationship struggles, and religious identity problems. This book tells many of those stories, giving voice to a generation of women who were systematically silenced and shamed under the guise of religion. I appreciate Klein's personal story, as well as her sensitivity as an interviewer. I was affected by the bravery of the women who told their stories; I was grieved that these toxic things happened to them, happened to us. And buried deep in there, I was comforted to know: There were adults who recognized how toxic it was, and they stood up for their beliefs. Many of them aren't in ministry any longer, ousted by other adults who had the power in their churches. This book is a needed step in dismantling purity culture and demanding better for our children.

  18. 4 out of 5

    neil

    This is the best book I've read about the purity movement. I've read a few memoirs from ex-Evangelicals during the past year or so, and many have touched on the purity movement and the damage it caused, but this one does a lot more--Klein tells her own story, as well as the story of many people she's interviewed over the course of many years, and she sums up some research and other writing on the topic. Strongly recommend.

  19. 4 out of 5

    David

    A look back on the fallout from the 1990s evangelical "purity movement" and where it has left many people today. (e.g., a recent apology from Josh Harris for convincing millions of teenagers not to date: https://www.christianpost.com/news/ab... )

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Very difficult to get through,but I think it's important for anyone raised in religion to read this. As an atheist now, the author's apologies for religion and the church sometimes made it hard to relate to the book; however, the content is important and necessary to read. This book is for anyone raised in or anyone who loves someone raised in purity culture.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    A little rambling, but there are stories to tell. The effect of the purity culture in the church on women. This is about women and for women, but the culture has adverse effects on me as a father and a man in the church. How I raised my children esp. my daughters and the effect it had on their lives. This is an important topic for parents to consider.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Thanks to the publisher, via Netgalley, for an advance e-galley in exchange for an honest review.' While I have no personal experience with the community being profiled in this book, I still found the stories of those who spoke about their experiences in this book to be powerful. It's possible that those who are members of the Evangelical Christian community will feel differently, but I didn't think that the book felt scathing- rather it reflected the wounds of the individuals and the systemic is Thanks to the publisher, via Netgalley, for an advance e-galley in exchange for an honest review.' While I have no personal experience with the community being profiled in this book, I still found the stories of those who spoke about their experiences in this book to be powerful. It's possible that those who are members of the Evangelical Christian community will feel differently, but I didn't think that the book felt scathing- rather it reflected the wounds of the individuals and the systemic issues the author has identified in her many years interviewing and researching.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    This was incredibly painful to read. It covered a lot of ground that is familiar to me, and it pissed me off. The process of writing and researching it must have been excruciating for the author. The comparison drawn between the church and dementors really resonated for me, how women (particularly trauma survivors) who were harmed by purity culture find it difficult or impossible to continue in relationship with the church because the church (like a dementor) forces them to relive all of their wo This was incredibly painful to read. It covered a lot of ground that is familiar to me, and it pissed me off. The process of writing and researching it must have been excruciating for the author. The comparison drawn between the church and dementors really resonated for me, how women (particularly trauma survivors) who were harmed by purity culture find it difficult or impossible to continue in relationship with the church because the church (like a dementor) forces them to relive all of their worst memories and experiences.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christiana Martin

    Perhaps one of the most important books I've ever read, this well researched, excellent piece of writing is a book I'll have to keep buying over and over so I can send it to all my friends. While some of Klein's work is deeply disturbing and challenging to read, I was encouraged by her dedication to the church's much needed reform efforts as well as her discussions of spirituality. Her work with her organization Break Free Together offers fellow and former evangelicals a place for healing and co Perhaps one of the most important books I've ever read, this well researched, excellent piece of writing is a book I'll have to keep buying over and over so I can send it to all my friends. While some of Klein's work is deeply disturbing and challenging to read, I was encouraged by her dedication to the church's much needed reform efforts as well as her discussions of spirituality. Her work with her organization Break Free Together offers fellow and former evangelicals a place for healing and community. I was astonished to learn that over $2 billion dollars has been spent in federal funding for abstinence only programs since 1981, and that the little silver ring I wore around my finger was part of the mega industry True Love Waits, and that they actively campaigned the government for the allocation of money to abstinence-only-marriage programming. This ensured that the message I heard at church was the same at school. The purity culture obsession of the late 80's through the early 2000's was ingrained in my formative years in a way that no previous generation experienced. I read this book and then called my mother and thanked her. She was probably the only reason I didn't end up as damaged by the purity culture as some of the women Klein profiles. While my mom herself was being regularly shamed by the church, (though not for purity reasons) she had the most powerful yet delicate ways of resetting some of the more damaging messages I'd received in youth group. Our long car ride conversations critiquing and questioning some of the church's purity messages were absolutely essential for my self esteem as the church was regularly breaking it down. Klein talks a lot about shame in her book and how we can be healed from it. She discusses some churches who are trying to model their communities and interactions more on the ethical teachings of Jesus. At one point she mentions one of these progressive evangelical churches and how by becoming more inclusive they must answer a lot of questions about what their fellowship time will look like. She describes an unmarried couple who host a bible study at their home. I was astonished. This could be possible? I had read this entire book but still had not fully realized how my worldview is still entrenched in the shaming of the purity culture. I am looking forward to reading this book again and again, and letting the reflection and healing process start. I am especially going to enjoy long chats with my childhood friends about how we can begin to change the conversation around purity culture and self esteem for our daughters!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Adina Hilton

    This was a tough read for me. As someone who grew up in the Evangelical church, and went through a similar "breaking" from religion, a lot of Klein's experiences and traumas were familiar to me. I absolutely think a religious focus on purity is damaging to young girls, and to young boys as well. The messages sent to young women about their sexuality may scar them in ways that will never heal (and many women interviewed in this book have experienced a lot of religious trauma). Klein writes the boo This was a tough read for me. As someone who grew up in the Evangelical church, and went through a similar "breaking" from religion, a lot of Klein's experiences and traumas were familiar to me. I absolutely think a religious focus on purity is damaging to young girls, and to young boys as well. The messages sent to young women about their sexuality may scar them in ways that will never heal (and many women interviewed in this book have experienced a lot of religious trauma). Klein writes the book as mostly a memoir--but supplements her own experiences with many interviews with other women who have experienced similar religious purity messages. It's important to note that the experiences detailed in this book are from a white, middle-class, Christian Evangelical demographic of women. It's a VERY SPECIFIC subset of the population, and Klein's book should not be mistaken for a representative look at this issue. I found this book helpful for myself, and my own experiences, to show that other people have experiences similar to my own. I think this book can be read an enjoyed if it's viewed as a memoir only (with some supplementary interviews) and NOT as a nonfiction/authority on religious purity messages.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Decker

    At first I wasn’t sure I’d like this book because I saw it as an ode to victim’s mentality. But as I read on I was captured by the powerful interviews with women, which Klein skillfully intertwine with theories of psychology and other academic disciplines. Even if you didn’t grow up in the purity movement you’re sure to recognize the patterns of oppression against women that cut across all segments of our society.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Klein offers important perspective relevant to us all as religious extremism seeps into our culture and politics seemingly a little bit more everyday. After reading this book I'm more confused than ever why so many people participate in this culture of shame and control. I am glad that the author is providing a platform for people to share their stories.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah O'Dell

    4.5

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jen Gray

    You don’t have to agree with her personal outcome (ahem evangelicals) to get that shaming women is epidemic in the evangelical movement. I applaud the author’s vulnerability and her fair treatment of her interviewees. I think this book starts an important conversation and can help some women begin to heal, if only in knowing they are not alone and not crazy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shari Ariail

    The topic of how evangelism and the purity movement damages young girls is interesting in the milieu of the me too movement. The author shared her own damaging experiences with the denigrating beliefs of the evangelical church which taught that women are inferior to men and how it affected her life and those of her friends. The structure of the book was not successful as the author attempted to interweave pieces of her stories with those of the women she interviewed resulting in a choppiness and The topic of how evangelism and the purity movement damages young girls is interesting in the milieu of the me too movement. The author shared her own damaging experiences with the denigrating beliefs of the evangelical church which taught that women are inferior to men and how it affected her life and those of her friends. The structure of the book was not successful as the author attempted to interweave pieces of her stories with those of the women she interviewed resulting in a choppiness and lack of cohesiveness.

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