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In 1911, Carrie Strahorn wrote a memoir entitled Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, which shared some of the most exciting events of 25 years of traveling and shaping the American West with her husband, Robert Strahorn, a railroad promoter, investor, and writer. That is all fact. Everything She Didn't Say imagines Carrie nearly ten years later as she decides to write down wh In 1911, Carrie Strahorn wrote a memoir entitled Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, which shared some of the most exciting events of 25 years of traveling and shaping the American West with her husband, Robert Strahorn, a railroad promoter, investor, and writer. That is all fact. Everything She Didn't Say imagines Carrie nearly ten years later as she decides to write down what was really on her mind during those adventurous nomadic years. Certain that her husband will not read it, and in fact that it will only be found after her death, Carrie is finally willing to explore the lessons she learned along the way, including the danger a woman faces of losing herself within a relationship with a strong-willed man and the courage it takes to accept her own God-given worth apart from him. Carrie discovers that wealth doesn't insulate a soul from pain and disappointment, family is essential, pioneering is a challenge, and western landscapes are both demanding and nourishing. Most of all, she discovers that home can be found, even in a rootless life. With a deft hand, New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick draws out the emotions of living--the laughter and pain, the love and loss--to give readers a window not only into the past, but into their own conflicted hearts. Based on a true story.


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In 1911, Carrie Strahorn wrote a memoir entitled Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, which shared some of the most exciting events of 25 years of traveling and shaping the American West with her husband, Robert Strahorn, a railroad promoter, investor, and writer. That is all fact. Everything She Didn't Say imagines Carrie nearly ten years later as she decides to write down wh In 1911, Carrie Strahorn wrote a memoir entitled Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, which shared some of the most exciting events of 25 years of traveling and shaping the American West with her husband, Robert Strahorn, a railroad promoter, investor, and writer. That is all fact. Everything She Didn't Say imagines Carrie nearly ten years later as she decides to write down what was really on her mind during those adventurous nomadic years. Certain that her husband will not read it, and in fact that it will only be found after her death, Carrie is finally willing to explore the lessons she learned along the way, including the danger a woman faces of losing herself within a relationship with a strong-willed man and the courage it takes to accept her own God-given worth apart from him. Carrie discovers that wealth doesn't insulate a soul from pain and disappointment, family is essential, pioneering is a challenge, and western landscapes are both demanding and nourishing. Most of all, she discovers that home can be found, even in a rootless life. With a deft hand, New York Times bestselling author Jane Kirkpatrick draws out the emotions of living--the laughter and pain, the love and loss--to give readers a window not only into the past, but into their own conflicted hearts. Based on a true story.

30 review for Everything She Didn't Say

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I received this book for free from the publisher (Revell Books) in exchange for an honest review. This book provided a fascinating glimpse into the real life of Carrie Strahorn, a famous pioneer woman. Prior to reading this book, I had never even heard of her. I loved how the book focused on the things Carrie didn’t say in her memoir. It gave a nuanced portrayal of the actuality and hardships of being a pioneer, as well as just being a woman during her time. I also liked how it explored her comp I received this book for free from the publisher (Revell Books) in exchange for an honest review. This book provided a fascinating glimpse into the real life of Carrie Strahorn, a famous pioneer woman. Prior to reading this book, I had never even heard of her. I loved how the book focused on the things Carrie didn’t say in her memoir. It gave a nuanced portrayal of the actuality and hardships of being a pioneer, as well as just being a woman during her time. I also liked how it explored her complicated relationship with her husband. It showed both the ups and downs of their marriage. The author did a tremendous amount of research and it really showed throughout the book. The book is rich in details and in facts. There is even an author’s note at the end, explaining what was fact and what was fiction. This book is published by a Christian publisher so there is a Christian element to it, but it’s very subtle and well done. My one critique is that the story dragged a bit in the middle since it was just Carrie and her husband constantly traveling. I got a little lost in it. Once they got settled down in a town the book picked up again. Overall, I really enjoyed learning about Carrie and the author did an amazing job portraying her life. For more book reviews, be sure to check out my blog: https://oddandbookish.wordpress.com/

  2. 5 out of 5

    Deanne Patterson

    This author always does such meticulous research while writing her books. Jane's newest book, Everything She Didn't say is based upon the life of Carrie Strahorn, a woman who travels around with her husband as he writes articles in hope of bringing people out west to the towns he builds up by way of the Union Pacific Railroad. You'll read about the things, Carrie can never share with her husband, her inner most thoughts,her hopes,dreams,the highs and lows. It's not easy to not have a permanent h This author always does such meticulous research while writing her books. Jane's newest book, Everything She Didn't say is based upon the life of Carrie Strahorn, a woman who travels around with her husband as he writes articles in hope of bringing people out west to the towns he builds up by way of the Union Pacific Railroad. You'll read about the things, Carrie can never share with her husband, her inner most thoughts,her hopes,dreams,the highs and lows. It's not easy to not have a permanent home always moving around with her husband's work but she did it, just like she gave up her dreams to make him happy. Kirkpatrick is one of my favorite historical authors, I've read many of her books and love all the research she has gathered for her historical book journeys. Pub Date 04 Sep 2018 I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell Publishers through Netgalley. All opinions are my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Loraine

    This book is based upon the real life story of Carrie "Dell" Strahorn and her husband Robert. Robert is a a railroad promoter, investor, and writer. His main task is to develop towns so that the Union Pacific Railroad can continue to lay track. Robert is a very strong-willed man and is constantly on the move as he writes about the west trying to entice newcomers to build new towns. Carrie is an independent woman who ends up traveling beside Robert; but, in turn, she gives up some of her dreams a This book is based upon the real life story of Carrie "Dell" Strahorn and her husband Robert. Robert is a a railroad promoter, investor, and writer. His main task is to develop towns so that the Union Pacific Railroad can continue to lay track. Robert is a very strong-willed man and is constantly on the move as he writes about the west trying to entice newcomers to build new towns. Carrie is an independent woman who ends up traveling beside Robert; but, in turn, she gives up some of her dreams and aspirations in order to be together. This story incorporates the use of Carrie's memoirs written during the 25 years of accompanying her husband. Kirkpatrick includes bits and pieces of the memoir throughout the chapters, so the reader can get a glimpse into the feelings of Carrie during the specific events Kirkpatrick is writing about. I have read several of Kirkpatrick's earlier books and enjoyed her rich historical detail immensely, but feel that this book would have been better written as a novel rather than somewhat of a memoir. I could never emotionally connect with either Carrie or Robert and found the book rather dry overall. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell Publishing through NetGalley. Opinions are mine alone. I was not compensated for this review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Amber Stokes

    The premise of this book is compelling, to think of what might have been left out of an adventure-filled memoir from the days of the Wild West. And the structure of this book is interesting, each chapter starting with a fictional journal entry, then continuing into scenes or memories told from the heroine's point of view, and ending with a quote from her actual memoir. A lot of ground—a lot of life and time—is covered in this book. It takes a bit to get used to, and sometimes the narrative flows The premise of this book is compelling, to think of what might have been left out of an adventure-filled memoir from the days of the Wild West. And the structure of this book is interesting, each chapter starting with a fictional journal entry, then continuing into scenes or memories told from the heroine's point of view, and ending with a quote from her actual memoir. A lot of ground—a lot of life and time—is covered in this book. It takes a bit to get used to, and sometimes the narrative flows well and goes deep into a scene, while other times it soars quickly over the months or years. I wouldn't say this is necessarily my favorite way for a story to be told, but the writing and research are far from lacking. And as much as these characters, these people from history, are flawed like we all are, the tale of their travel-filled lives and unfulfilled longings does eventually sweep the reader away. I imagine such a reality-based story does limit an author... I might have wished for a happier ending or more growth in a certain character. The author includes a long note at the end that answers a lot of questions about what's fictional and what's not, which left me both satisfied and saddened. Everything She Didn't Say is a different sort of story that brings a woman from the past into relatable light, exploring her marriage, desires, hardships, and resilience. The faith element is definitely there, although it feels like the emphasis tends to rest a little more on Carrie's choices and attitude than the sustaining power of God. While I would say Jane Kirkpatrick's Kinship and Courage series (All Together in One Place, No Eye Can See, What Once We Loved) is more up my alley from what I recall, this is still an intriguing, thought-provoking, sobering, and admirable piece of historical fiction. *With thanks to Revell for providing me with a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are my own.*

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maureen Timerman

    The author made me feel like I was sitting in the same room with Carrie/Dell, and I was traveling and experiencing amazing new frontiers, traveling by stage and being in Indian War country. Carrie became a friend and loved that the whole book is mainly fact, wow, makes everything so very real, and I felt the pain that she was never really given her heart’s desire. While Carrie stayed by choice in her husband’s shadow, she sure accomplished a lot on her own, and helping build her church seemed to b The author made me feel like I was sitting in the same room with Carrie/Dell, and I was traveling and experiencing amazing new frontiers, traveling by stage and being in Indian War country. Carrie became a friend and loved that the whole book is mainly fact, wow, makes everything so very real, and I felt the pain that she was never really given her heart’s desire. While Carrie stayed by choice in her husband’s shadow, she sure accomplished a lot on her own, and helping build her church seemed to be one of her cherished achievements. A really compelling read, filled with history and strong pioneers who helped build the western part of this country. The author did a great job of telling Carrie Strahorn’s story! I received this book through Revell Publishing, and was not required to give a positive review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christine Roberts

    This was an interesting book that made me want to know more about Robert and Carrie Strahorn. However, it felt very disjointed...like I was reading bits of a memoir, but not. I can't describe the way this book was written. It was interesting as I had never heard of the Strahorns and they did indeed live a very interesting life traveling throughout the West and raising funds and towns in order to build up the booming railroad expansion of the 1880s-90s. I think I might have like this book better This was an interesting book that made me want to know more about Robert and Carrie Strahorn. However, it felt very disjointed...like I was reading bits of a memoir, but not. I can't describe the way this book was written. It was interesting as I had never heard of the Strahorns and they did indeed live a very interesting life traveling throughout the West and raising funds and towns in order to build up the booming railroad expansion of the 1880s-90s. I think I might have like this book better if it were written as a novel, rather than a the way it was formatted. Their lives would make a great historical fiction series! They had a lot of great adventures and misadventures! Just the format of the book was tough for me to get into.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah Lewis

    An interesting and intriguing book. Had me laughing and at times had my heart breaking. My heart ached for a woman who died nearly 100 years ago. A beautiful woman who lived an extraordinary life. One of the most selfless, caring woman I have ever known through the pages of a book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    This is the third book I have read from this author. My track record is not that good. I think I will not be reading another book from this author. Which is a shame as I keep finding myself drawn to this author's books due to the time periods and the premises. The author has no problems with transporting me to the specific time periods that she writes about. What I struggle with are the characters. No matter how much I try and hope, I can't seem to find that emotional connection to them. Additio This is the third book I have read from this author. My track record is not that good. I think I will not be reading another book from this author. Which is a shame as I keep finding myself drawn to this author's books due to the time periods and the premises. The author has no problems with transporting me to the specific time periods that she writes about. What I struggle with are the characters. No matter how much I try and hope, I can't seem to find that emotional connection to them. Additionally, with this book, it moved slowly. Also, the way it was laid out did not work for me. There was the story and than there was Robert's memoir. Passages from his book were featured without this book. It did not flow. For me, it was stop and go; which made reading this book clunky. Overall, this book was not me cup of tea.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Everything She Didn’t Say was a story about a pioneer woman, who really did not want to be a pioneer woman. This was a different and intriguing story, based on a true life woman, Carrie Adelle Strahorn, a woman who travelled with her husband, Robert Strahorn a man who was an adventurer. Robert was a writer who worked for the railroad and produced pamphlets to bring folks out west. Carrie also wrote her memoirs concerning her travels with her husband. Author Kirkpatrick does a good job of bringin Everything She Didn’t Say was a story about a pioneer woman, who really did not want to be a pioneer woman. This was a different and intriguing story, based on a true life woman, Carrie Adelle Strahorn, a woman who travelled with her husband, Robert Strahorn a man who was an adventurer. Robert was a writer who worked for the railroad and produced pamphlets to bring folks out west. Carrie also wrote her memoirs concerning her travels with her husband. Author Kirkpatrick does a good job of bringing Carrie’s character to life, and we as a reader get a front row seat as she reveals her deepest thoughts and feelings, some of which she does not even share with her husband. I really liked Carrie and felt she could be any modern day woman- with hopes and dreams of a life she would like to live. But then, we fall in love with a man who has his own dreams and a different idea of the life he would like to live. Carrie wanted a home, which Robert was very willing to provide for her, but she was not willing to live with him gone most of the time for his work. So she trail blazed right along with him, hoping that she could be the helpmate and true partner that he always needed. Like all of us, Carrie had insecurities. One of them was that she was the second choice of wife for Robert. His first love, also named Carrie (and Carrie or “Dell” (as Robert called her from the beginning of their marriage) - was her best friend) died. So he married Carrie, choosing to call her Dell from her middle name. Carrie was somewhat uncomfortable with this, but decided to make the best of it and called Robert a nickname as well. There were many sayings in the book that just really stood out and inspired me. If I was a person who wrote in my books, it would be heavily underlined. All in all, this was an interesting read on a true woman pioneer who decided to take what life had offered, her marriage and her work, and make the best of it and make it an adventure it truly was. I received a copy of this novel from the publisher. I was not required to post a positive review and all views and opinions are my own. https://pausefortales.blogspot.com/20...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Trixi

    This book is lovingly dedicated to my dear husband Robert E. Strahorn whose constant chum and companion it has been my greatest joy to be for more than thirty years in the conquering of the wilderness. ~ Carrie Adell Strahorn (dedication page from Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, volume 1.) A memoir is no place to whine but rather give us wisdom we can all share without having to go through the pain ourselves. While this is a true account of Robert and Carrie “Dell” Strahorns' life, it is also This book is lovingly dedicated to my dear husband Robert E. Strahorn whose constant chum and companion it has been my greatest joy to be for more than thirty years in the conquering of the wilderness. ~ Carrie Adell Strahorn (dedication page from Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, volume 1.) A memoir is no place to whine but rather give us wisdom we can all share without having to go through the pain ourselves. While this is a true account of Robert and Carrie “Dell” Strahorns' life, it is also written with the literary license to bring these two people to life. Following along their many years of traveling to birth towns and rail lines from 1877 to 1925. Kirkpatrick has the wondrous ability to spotlight figures in history that you would not otherwise read about. From various research sources she gleans fact and turns it into fiction. It's mostly from Dell's point of view and her inner musings as she travels along with her husband. There are things she would never speak aloud to him and the title of the book is a perfect fit. You'll glimpse her disappointment, heartache, broken dreams, and most inner desires of her heart. But you'll also see her courageous and adventurous spirit and the unconditional support of her husband. Their love is strong and can cushion anything life throws at them. I loved following along with them and learning how their vast influence formed the various railroads around the country. Making history in our own modern world! I also loved how the author incorporated snippets from Dell's memoir before each chapter. You got a feel for what she was like and how she felt. This makes me want to search it out to read myself! In short, Kirkpatrick is one of my top favorite historical writers and I've never read a book I didn't like by her. She always breathes life into dusty books, diaries or memoirs for me! *I received a copy of this book from Revell and Netgalley and was under no obligation to leave a favorable review. All opinions are my own. *

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Johnson

    Title: Everything She Didn’t Say Author: Jane Kirkpatrick Pages: 352 Year: 2018 Publisher: Revell My rating: 5+ out of 5 stars Sometimes I am surprised by the revealing of people, events and more I have yet to learn about in history. Many times, it is the ordinary person living their lives and writing down their memories never knowing that years later someone unearths it again, blows off the dust and engages a new generation into their personal life experiences. Jane Kirkpatrick reveals to readers a re Title: Everything She Didn’t Say Author: Jane Kirkpatrick Pages: 352 Year: 2018 Publisher: Revell My rating: 5+ out of 5 stars Sometimes I am surprised by the revealing of people, events and more I have yet to learn about in history. Many times, it is the ordinary person living their lives and writing down their memories never knowing that years later someone unearths it again, blows off the dust and engages a new generation into their personal life experiences. Jane Kirkpatrick reveals to readers a real pioneer of a woman who never knew what her life was going to be like. Carrie Strahorn married Robert Strahorn in love and with hopes of one day being a mother and living life as most women of her time did, taking care of the hearth and home. What Carrie experiences is far from what she ever imagined; it was not easy, and it sometimes broke her heart. In an era when railroads were beginning to expand westward and competition was stiff, sometimes Carrie and Robert had to travel for miles just to get where Robert was to go and collect data. Robert was an author who wrote books with the aim of luring people out West to tame, grow and bring out of the dust communities where families could set down roots. While he was good about writing it, it was the way he loved to live that caused Carrie to struggle. Her faith was what ultimately kept her beside her man and seeing for herself what God had called her to do. Jane Kirkpatrick is a good storyteller of history who takes it from the dusty tomes she mines and brings it alive, so readers can enjoy the people who inhabited a certain frame of time. Jane has written many books that reveal such unique people and experiences. Each one is worth having in a personal library to share with others. Since there doesn’t seem to be much worth watching, why not pick up this book and enjoy reading Carrie’s story in a fictional setting with the story of the real Carrie told to us in the back of the book? I guarantee you will want to read more of Jane’s books in the future! Note: I received a complimentary copy for an honest review of this book. The opinions shared in this review are solely my responsibility. Other reviews can be read at http://seekingwithallyurheart.blogspo.... Also follow me on [email protected], Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/lisa.johnson...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Sluiter

    Carefully researched with great detail, author Jane Kirkpatrick gives us a book based on the true story of Carrie Strahorn. That alone makes it more intriguing to me. Reading much like a memoir, journal entries at the beginning of each chapter add interest. Stories of travel and places they went, both together and separate, were well described. The time frame this took place in was not an easy one for women who wanted to travel with their husbands. Nor was the marriage between Robert and Carrie e Carefully researched with great detail, author Jane Kirkpatrick gives us a book based on the true story of Carrie Strahorn. That alone makes it more intriguing to me. Reading much like a memoir, journal entries at the beginning of each chapter add interest. Stories of travel and places they went, both together and separate, were well described. The time frame this took place in was not an easy one for women who wanted to travel with their husbands. Nor was the marriage between Robert and Carrie easy. I found at times that I wanted to shake one or the other of them. At times the story was a bit slow but hang in there. If you enjoy historical fiction written from the basis of a true story then I recommend Everything She Didn’t Say. I received a complimentary copy of this book but was not required to leave a review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Everything She Didn't Say is the newest release by Jane Kirkpatrick. I love historicals and love them more when they were based on real people. However, the style this story was written was not one I enjoy as much as others I have read in the past. I did not feel connected to Carrie as I would have liked. I enjoyed reading about the travelling her and Robert did and what they experienced. I like reading the author's note and learn more about them. Everything She Didn't Say is worth the read, but Everything She Didn't Say is the newest release by Jane Kirkpatrick. I love historicals and love them more when they were based on real people. However, the style this story was written was not one I enjoy as much as others I have read in the past. I did not feel connected to Carrie as I would have liked. I enjoyed reading about the travelling her and Robert did and what they experienced. I like reading the author's note and learn more about them. Everything She Didn't Say is worth the read, but unfortunately not my favorite read by this author. I give it three stars. I received this book from the publisher, but was not required to write a review. This review is 100% my own honest opinion.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    4 stars Everything She Didn’t Say by Jane Kirkpatrick is a fascinating book. It imagines the life of Carrie Strahorn and what she didn’t include (say) in her memoir “Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage”. I had to keep reminding myself I was reading historical fiction. I kept wanting Dell to stand up for herself as most women would do now. However, considering this book is set in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s, her reactions to her husband were perfectly reasonable while thoroughly frustrating. I was s 4 stars Everything She Didn’t Say by Jane Kirkpatrick is a fascinating book. It imagines the life of Carrie Strahorn and what she didn’t include (say) in her memoir “Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage”. I had to keep reminding myself I was reading historical fiction. I kept wanting Dell to stand up for herself as most women would do now. However, considering this book is set in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s, her reactions to her husband were perfectly reasonable while thoroughly frustrating. I was sucked into the life of Dell and her “pard” from page one. Jane Kirkpatrick deftly expanded on her memoir in such a way that it was hard to forget this was a fictionalized tale of a true story. I highly recommend this book to all women, as it shows what life was like for a woman over 100 years ago. I identified with and deeply felt for Dell and the other pioneering women in this book; for they broke a great many barriers for women and paid a very heavy price for it. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. #Everythingshedidn’tsay #NetGalley

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    Jane Kirkpatrick has committed her writing career to revealing the true stories of real pioneer women, who played pivotal roles in settling the west coast, despite remaining unknown to most Americans. Many of the women she has written about helped establish towns, made non-traditional career choices, and found ways to help those in need. Weather and the land itself often stood in their way. Sometimes they faced danger from warring natives, but they also faced barriers from their spouses, neighb Jane Kirkpatrick has committed her writing career to revealing the true stories of real pioneer women, who played pivotal roles in settling the west coast, despite remaining unknown to most Americans. Many of the women she has written about helped establish towns, made non-traditional career choices, and found ways to help those in need. Weather and the land itself often stood in their way. Sometimes they faced danger from warring natives, but they also faced barriers from their spouses, neighbors and society's mores. I have learned so much about the settling of Oregon and Washington from the special women she written about (and personally believe that every US History student should be required to read one of her books). In her latest book, EVERYTHING SHE DIDN'T SAY, Kirkpatrick tells about Carrie Adell Green Strahorn and her husband Robert Strahorn. In the 1870's, as the railroads began to expand across the country, Robert Strahorn was hired by the Union Pacific Railroad to travel the west and then write about what he saw. His sole purpose - to encourage settlement of the west, especially in those areas that the railroad had land for sale. At the time Robert, 25, had just married the intelligent, college educated Carrie Green, whom he nicknamed Dell. While Dell longed to settle into a newlywed home, she agreed to travel the rails for a few months with Robert. Instead of a first home, the couple moved from hotel room to hotel room and traveled thousands of miles by stage and rail. To meet his writing deadlines, Robert relied on Dell's shape editing eye, sometimes even using her descriptive language as his own. The promise of accompanying him for a few months grew into years on the road. As they traveled from unknown town to another possible railroad hub, Dell kept a diary, thinking someday she would write a memoir. She also wrote long descriptive letters to her mother back in Illinois. Eventually she began to write articles for newspapers back east under a pseudonym. At one point, Dell accompanied her husband into Yellowstone, possibly being the first non-native woman to see its beauty. As the years went on, it appeared that the Strahorns were accumulating wealth, but none of that mattered to Dell. As the title states (EVERYTHING SHE DIDN'T SAY), Dell held back her real desires of a home and family and true friends. Although she tried, she could not voice the great void she felt each time Robert left her for a railroad need. When she learns the true state of their finances, she again stands silent by Robert, but would have gladly given up any desire for wealth in exchange for stability and a child to hold. Eventually Carrie Adell Green Strahorn does write her memoir FIFTEEN THOUSAND MILES BY STAGE 1887-1890 and becomes known as the Mother of the West. While others eagerly read her words to learn the truth of the west, Dell alone knew that what she told was the truth told "slant." Readers of Emily Dickinson's poetry will understand this meaning. This novel covers decades of time and obviously thousands of miles. Still, it is really the story of a marriage and the need to be valued and loved. As always, I learned something new about the Manifest Destiny of our country. In this novel, it was how the railroad used the media of the day (books and newspapers) for their gain. I am a fast reader, but when I read a Kirkpatrick novel, I slow down to grasp the authentic historical setting. Whether it's Dell planting trees in the arid Utah land or a stage coach ride so bumpy that the youngest riders become "seasick," it's the details that make the story worth reading. The only downfall in reading the latest Kirkpatrick novel is that I will now need to wait probably a whole year before I can read another. However, if she is a new author to you, you are in for a treat. She has written 24 novels that you can enjoy, along with several novellas and nonfiction books. I received a copy of this book from Revell. All opinions are mine.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    My experience with Jane Kirkpatrick has been similar for each book I’ve read of hers: appreciation for the historical research, but boredom with the overall storyline. As I mentioned in my review of The Road We Traveled, “there were parts of the book where I went “Hmm, this is interesting,” and then there were more parts where I wondered when the book would be over.” I really don’t understand how a book could be so carefully researched, yet falter in terms of pace and holding the reader’s attent My experience with Jane Kirkpatrick has been similar for each book I’ve read of hers: appreciation for the historical research, but boredom with the overall storyline. As I mentioned in my review of The Road We Traveled, “there were parts of the book where I went “Hmm, this is interesting,” and then there were more parts where I wondered when the book would be over.” I really don’t understand how a book could be so carefully researched, yet falter in terms of pace and holding the reader’s attention entirely. Or perhaps I simply really don’t like books that just meander through someone’s life (as I’ve also mentioned in my previous Kirkpatrick reviews). The format of the book was very confusing to me. Obviously, the excerpts at the end of each chapter are from Carrie Strahorn’s actual memoir, Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage. Yet, there are also journal entries at the beginning of each chapter—are these Carrie’s actual journals, or things made up by Kirkpatrick so the reader knows what year it is? I also had issues with what I must assume are severe creative liberties on the part of Kirkpatrick—she is filling in the gaps only with what she thinks is true, based off of the few things we have about Carrie. And I get that this is historical fiction, not biography, but the picture built of Carrie, of this strong woman who managed to hold her own and carve her own path despite her husband’s domineering nature, is a fictionalized picture. Were any of the thoughts and feelings in this book part of the real Carrie Strahorn? I guess I wouldn’t mind so much if I didn’t think so highly of context and accuracy. Everything We Didn’t Say is a good look at a woman I knew nothing about, who helped pave the way in the West along with her husband, Robert Strahorn. This Carrie is a good model, and there are many points in this book ripe for discussion, but I left the book without a solid idea of what the true Carrie was really like. In true Kirkpatrick style, the research was great, the actual grip and hook of the book…not so much. I would enjoy her so much more if she was just a little more exciting as a writer, though I suppose that’s the draw—she documents more aspects of someone’s life than simply the “exciting” parts. I just wish, in this case, there was more of a clear idea that she was actually crafting a true representation. Disclaimer: Book provided by publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brandi (Rambles of a SAHM)

    Jane Kirkpatrick has once again found a little known female pioneer and brought her story to us. We've come to expect interesting stories about women that in their own unique ways helped to shape our nation. In Everything She Didn't Say, Ms. Kirkpatrick uses Carrie Strahorn's actual account as the building blocks of the novel then fills in the nuances from her own imagination and historical facts. The result is a fasinating story of one ordinary woman doing extraordinary things. Carrie Strahorn i Jane Kirkpatrick has once again found a little known female pioneer and brought her story to us. We've come to expect interesting stories about women that in their own unique ways helped to shape our nation. In Everything She Didn't Say, Ms. Kirkpatrick uses Carrie Strahorn's actual account as the building blocks of the novel then fills in the nuances from her own imagination and historical facts. The result is a fasinating story of one ordinary woman doing extraordinary things. Carrie Strahorn isn't someone that you would be familiar with unless you happen to be from one of the towns that she helped establish. She grew up in a Chicago suburb as the daughter of a prominent physician. She lived a privileged life that led to her meeting Robert Strahorn. She fell in love and they soon married. Like most women of that time Carrie imagined settling down and raising a family. She quickly learned that settling down with Robert was not in the cards. Robert was an aspiring railroad promoter and writer. That meant travel, lots of travel. Again the story is fascinating yet heartbreaking at the same time. Carrie's story is a wonderful example of what dying to self means. Time after time she had to make the decision to put aside her wishes and dreams because of a covenant she made. As a wife and mother I can relate. It's a daily struggle to put aside personal ambitions in order to fulfill someone else's dreams. The following quote is my favorite from the novel. I think it captures the essence of the story. "What I hadn't realized then--and that Caldwell helped teach me--is that it's how we respond to the broken tracks that matters, because there will always be brokenness. It's what we do with the punches we take, the heart-stopping moments, those are the knives that carve out who we are. I came to believe that people born with silver spoons in their mouths never get the real nourishment they need to grow to their full height unless the spoon tarnishes or the food drops off now and then and they have to find a way to pick it up themselves. They're really deprived, which may be why we call them "spoiled," like meat left out in the son." I highly recommend this book to all women. Carrie leads a different life than most of us, but her experiences are riddled with lessons for each of us. I received a copy of this book to facilitate my review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meagan Myhren-bennett

    Everything She Didn't Say By Jane Kirkpatrick Carrie Adell Green married Robert Strahorn in September of 1877 and began the adventure of a lifetime. Following her husband into the wilderness of America's West at her own insistence she became a trailblazer embarking on one adventure after another. Roughing it with the men who were tasked with taming the West. Robert was known for his articles and books about the West. His work was funded by the Union Pacific Railroad - a PR man if you will, tasked w Everything She Didn't Say By Jane Kirkpatrick Carrie Adell Green married Robert Strahorn in September of 1877 and began the adventure of a lifetime. Following her husband into the wilderness of America's West at her own insistence she became a trailblazer embarking on one adventure after another. Roughing it with the men who were tasked with taming the West. Robert was known for his articles and books about the West. His work was funded by the Union Pacific Railroad - a PR man if you will, tasked with convincing the average citizen to move West and bring civilization with them. Creating a market for what the railroad would be offering transportation of people to the West and goods to the East. Carrie was not about to sit around waiting as Robert explored the West and insisted that he convince the UP officials that her presence would add to the appeal - a lady of family and standing who was able to traverse the unknown regions and dangers of the West, sharing her experiences, offering a woman's perspective. Through her experiences, Carrie has to deal with disappointments - want of a permanent home, children, and a husband who was not quite what she wished. But Carrie persevered handling what came her way each and every time. And she recorded her experiences in a journal which she hoped to one day share with the world in a memoir. Like all of Jane Kirkpatrick's books she once again draws on a person who helped shape our country and our way of thinking. Carrie Strahorn is a person of whom I had not been previously aware of and found her story to be a wonderful glimpse into the past. It is interesting how depending on the state/territory that they were visiting just what rights women had. I also found the attitudes of some of the men interesting when Carrie asserted her opinion and went along on excursions that they deemed too dangerous for a lady. I would highly recommend Everything She Didn't Say for a book club setting (in fact this will be one that I'll be using in my own book club next year). For teens looking for a historical fiction for a book report, this one is worth considering. I was provided a complimentary copy of this book by Revell with no expectation except that I give my honest opinion.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Narita

    Will Rogers said he never meet a man he didn’t like, well I never read a Jane Kirkpatrick book I didn’t like! Her books always draw me in because they are about real people and history. She never ceases to amaze me how she fleshes out the historical facts she has with emotions and details to make the reader feel like they are living actual events. She has introduced me to so many women that played important roles in the past that I have never heard of. Carrie Strahorn lived an exciting and adven Will Rogers said he never meet a man he didn’t like, well I never read a Jane Kirkpatrick book I didn’t like! Her books always draw me in because they are about real people and history. She never ceases to amaze me how she fleshes out the historical facts she has with emotions and details to make the reader feel like they are living actual events. She has introduced me to so many women that played important roles in the past that I have never heard of. Carrie Strahorn lived an exciting and adventurous life that few women in her time had the opportunity to experience. When she married Robert Strahorn she believed her dreams would be fulfilled; children, a home, being a homemaker and entertaining friends and family as her mother had. After her the vows her said, she quickly found her life would be nothing like this. In fact it would be totally the opposite. Her husband Robert Strahorn was a writer for the railroad, creating detailed pamphlets to attract people to move west and settle with the purpose of creating communities and towns where the railroad would eventually travel through. To say this was a passion of his is an understatement. Travel almost constant travel by train, stage coach, and ship spanned a period of 45 years. There were not the comforts and amenities we have now not to mention how rough, dangerous, exhausting those modes of travel were. I don’t know how she survived. A long car trip does me in! I loved the part where they rode and cow catcher on the front of the train for a thrill; hilarious but frightening! I greatly admired her dedication and commitment to her marriage. It was far from perfect, but she chose to be the best wife she could and turn to the Lord to deal with her many hurts and struggles. Ms. Strahorn wrote a memoir, Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage. There are excerpts from this book at the end of each chapter. I am looking forward to reading this book also and of course the next one Ms. Kirkpatrick writes! I received this book from Revell Publishing in exchange for an honest review. The opinions I have stated are my own .

  20. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Liles

    When I read books to review I look for books that interest me, that may have an interesting graphic on a book, or perhaps--even possibly--be based on some truth. That is the case for Jane Kirkpatrick's book Everything She Didn't Say. While Jane Kirkpatrick has written tons, a myriad, of books and loads of stories left to tell as well, she has won awards for her books. She is a New York Times and CBA bestselling author of more than thirty books. Among this list are the books All She Left Behind, When I read books to review I look for books that interest me, that may have an interesting graphic on a book, or perhaps--even possibly--be based on some truth. That is the case for Jane Kirkpatrick's book Everything She Didn't Say. While Jane Kirkpatrick has written tons, a myriad, of books and loads of stories left to tell as well, she has won awards for her books. She is a New York Times and CBA bestselling author of more than thirty books. Among this list are the books All She Left Behind, This Road We Traveled, and The Memory Weaver. Within the first few pages of her latest book, Everything She Didn't Say, I was hooked. Carrie Adell (nee Green) Strahorn lived an adventurous life she never truthfully intended to embark upon. She followed a man she married by the name of Robert Strahorn--a rail road man, who also wrote books on the side for Union Pacific--to bring people west to settle what are now Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Washington, California, and Montana. Jane has done an incredible job, surprisingly so, structuring a fictional novel based around Carrie's written memoirs on her time and travels with Robert Strahorn. The book I am referring to that Carrie Strahorn produced, which Jane Kirkpatrick references in Everything is Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage. I don't doubt the hardships, the struggles Carrie Strahorn undertook to travel with her "Pard," Robert Strahorn, but she bore it with such grace that when you read Everything by Jane Kirkpatrick you realize this lady wrote a tremendous book based on a real-life pioneer of the West. In all honesty, I loved this book. It has every element needed in it for it to be a success. If you don't mind me saying it here, this book is a must read if you love history and Westerns. With that said I believe my parting words ought to be, "Until we pass this way once more, partner." I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell in the hopes of an honest and fair review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia

    Liked Where do I start? This book is SO GOOD! I had really low expectations for it but it blew me away! I really, really, really loved the authenticity that this book has (I mean, it is based on a memoir but this book felt super authentic). I felt as if Carrie "Dell" was sitting next to me and talking to me. One of the things that I really appreciated was the fact the Carrie struggled with her body image, which I haven't read much of. This is something that I have an on-and-off battle with so thi Liked Where do I start? This book is SO GOOD! I had really low expectations for it but it blew me away! I really, really, really loved the authenticity that this book has (I mean, it is based on a memoir but this book felt super authentic). I felt as if Carrie "Dell" was sitting next to me and talking to me. One of the things that I really appreciated was the fact the Carrie struggled with her body image, which I haven't read much of. This is something that I have an on-and-off battle with so this was so great to read. All the descriptions made me feel like I had stepped inside that time period and was traveling all over the place with "Dell" and "Pard". I could also feel Carrie's pain and teared up a few times. I also learned a lot about Manifest Destiny and even though Robert and Carrie Strahorn are real and did so much, I don't think I've ever heard of them. I love books that make me laugh, and (you guessed it), this book made me laugh. I was reading and started cracking up and my sisters gave me the "yep she's insane" look. The humor felt really real and it wasn't forced. I'm laughing now just thinking about it. The adventures were so great! Again, they all felt very real and a lot of them were hilarious. But whenever something went wrong my heart started pounding and you just want everything to turn out alright. Okay, so the book starts out with Carrie and Robert getting married and yes, I did want to smack Robert a few times, but his adoration for Carrie was soooo adorable. And Carrie's love for her husband was so real (seeing a pattern here?:P) and inspiring. Disliked I actually can't think of anything that I disliked. I really liked this book xD Content Like I said, the book starts with Carrie and Robert getting married so there are some references to that but it's clean besides those few references. I would like to thank Revell Reads for giving me a free copy of Everything She Didn't Say in exchange for my honest opinion.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sonya

    Although I was expecting more of a “romance” from the cover, and it took a bit to adjust to the memoir style, I enjoyed Kirkpatrick’s Everything She Didn’t Say. The romance came more from how Dell, the main female character, learned to love her eccentric, distracting, self-absorbed husband. She follows her husband as he travels and writes books and pamphlets to encourage migration to the West. She struggles as her husband often leaves her for some investment while she follows by stage, train, wag Although I was expecting more of a “romance” from the cover, and it took a bit to adjust to the memoir style, I enjoyed Kirkpatrick’s Everything She Didn’t Say. The romance came more from how Dell, the main female character, learned to love her eccentric, distracting, self-absorbed husband. She follows her husband as he travels and writes books and pamphlets to encourage migration to the West. She struggles as her husband often leaves her for some investment while she follows by stage, train, wagon and horse in areas only travelled by men. Dell longs to settle somewhere and have a family. Her husband writes in a scientific, researchers manner whereas she journals her memories to someday write of her own adventures. Her letters home portray the “sunshine not the shadows” of her journey, leaving her family to worry about “between the lines.” Jane writes what is real—the difficulty of supporting a husband who thinks only of his next dream, even if he leaves his wife behind in a dust bowl. She illustrates the principle “stand by your man.” I found myself underlining and highlighting many gems of wisdom about people as Dell considered her own thoughts and how to support her husband. Although normally I wouldn’t choose a memoir to read, and this is a fiction version of one, I found this book a refreshing change from the strong independent women that grace the current shelves of Historical Romance. Yes, Dell was strong. Yes, she longed for a purpose beyond her husband’s successes, but her longing centered on woman’s core make-up: to nurture and make a home. The memoir style also made it hard to feel the action, almost like I was detached, since Dell was writing about it in past tense. So the action seemed slow, if that makes sense. An example of true support when all was at stake and nothing personal was gained. Good read. Thank you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mardell

    Everything She Didn't Say by Jane Kirkpatrick is an amazing book. I just put the book down after spending the day between the covers. Carrie Adell Strahorn was called the "Queen of the Pioneers" or "Mother of the West" by many and once you read her compelling story you will agree. What a life this pioneering woman led. The book begins on the day she married Robert E Strahorn, and from that day on she literally embarked on a trip that would take her by stage, foot, train, steamer and foot on jour Everything She Didn't Say by Jane Kirkpatrick is an amazing book. I just put the book down after spending the day between the covers. Carrie Adell Strahorn was called the "Queen of the Pioneers" or "Mother of the West" by many and once you read her compelling story you will agree. What a life this pioneering woman led. The book begins on the day she married Robert E Strahorn, and from that day on she literally embarked on a trip that would take her by stage, foot, train, steamer and foot on journeys white women never ventured. She rode in a cow catcher, scaled a mine, laid on her belly overlooking Yellowstone Falls in the snow. Her stay in a Wyoming hotel with electricity contrasted with harrowing stage rides amid war with the Bannocks. I can't imagine living up to those challenges but she was determined to be supportive of her husband in his endeavors as an author who wrote travel pamphlets for the Union Pacific Railroad. He was always one step ahead of settling down with what she longed for; a home and family. What really impressed me about Carrie Strahorn was the depth of her faith and perseverance. I loved that her travels intersected with my own travels and life in Spokane. It was in Spokane that Robert bought the Pines for Carrie and under the direction of famous architect Kirtland Cutter it was redesigned as she wished. She felt so at home in Spokane, a feeling she hadn't had since leaving her beloved Caldwell. As with all of her historical novels, author Jane Kirkpatrick engages the reader into historical events with wonderful story telling and impeccable research. I highly recommend this book to the reader who loves historical fiction, especially when it includes how this wonderful west was settled. Many thanks to Revell Books for an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review of this book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katie Paul

    While I really liked the background history and idea of this story, I was not all too fond of the format and way it was executed. While reading, I felt like I missed out on something. As I've read in reviews about this book before, there could've been more. What I thought was missing was character development. I think the author was so worried about cramming all the adventures and stories into the book, she left out some key elements. I think the story of this couple could be broken up into a wh While I really liked the background history and idea of this story, I was not all too fond of the format and way it was executed. While reading, I felt like I missed out on something. As I've read in reviews about this book before, there could've been more. What I thought was missing was character development. I think the author was so worried about cramming all the adventures and stories into the book, she left out some key elements. I think the story of this couple could be broken up into a whole series. I would've liked to have known who these people were before they were married to each other so we can see the difference and development of how the life in the West really affected them. Again, while the background history is fascinating, I felt I was missing personal background history of our characters. I would've liked to know how Carrie was as a teen, young adult, and more about her relationship with her family. And the same goes for Robert. I think with that readers would begin to understand the full effect of her life changing so drastically and how she was faithful and courageous and took a chance on following her husband rather than planting roots and raising a family which is what she really wanted to begin with. With a little more background, we can begin to really understand how much of a sacrifice it was for Carrie to take that leap of faith for Robert. And also, with more background, we could learn more about Robert and Carrie's relationship and how it grew and started off. Personally, I enjoy more character background in that aspect. I like to know how things started and how they ended up the way they are presently. But overall, I liked the story and where the author was going with it. It is a fascinating piece of history I had no idea about. I just wish there was more.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Barb Klein

    Jane Kirkpatrick is a very talented author. Her books are very true to original stories and about true figures in history. I read “All She Left Behind” and was anxious to read “Everything She Didn't Say”. I found the writing in both novels to be the same quality in describing the pioneers heading west in the late 1800’s. This particular novel is based on the journal writings of Carrie Strahorn. She details her journey west with her husband, who worked for the Union Pacific railroad. His job was Jane Kirkpatrick is a very talented author. Her books are very true to original stories and about true figures in history. I read “All She Left Behind” and was anxious to read “Everything She Didn't Say”. I found the writing in both novels to be the same quality in describing the pioneers heading west in the late 1800’s. This particular novel is based on the journal writings of Carrie Strahorn. She details her journey west with her husband, who worked for the Union Pacific railroad. His job was to start the beginnings of towns that the railroad would follow on its way west. From her writings, it is clear that she was not really happy in her marriage and did what she had to do to keep her husband happy. Her life did not turn out anything as she expected it to, but she persevered. I felt so sorry for her and for the other pioneer women who traveled west because their husbands sought riches and prosperity both from the gold fields and from the land. I’m afraid that I would not have made a good pioneer woman. Traveling and living in the west at this time brought no refinement. The living conditions were dirty, meager and lonely. Most women of this day and age would not tolerate the control husbands had over their wives. For women to have a say in any financial or any other aspect of their marriage was unheard of. This novel gives a wonderful look into the life of women of that period. As one of the Revell Reads Blog Tour Reviewer, I received a print copy of this book to read and review. I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. You can find this review on my blog at https://wp.me/p2pjIt-wa. Other reviews can be found at http://imhookedonbooks.wordpress.com.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary E Trimble

    Author Jane Kirkpatrick’s new historical novel, Everything She Didn’t Say, reveals the plight of many women, even today. The novel is based on a true story, and knowing Kirkpatrick’s skillful extensive research, there is probably more truth than fiction to this story. The novel takes place in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Carrie, the daughter of a prominent physician, married Robert Strahorn who worked for the Union Pacific railroad. His job was to develop new towns that the railroad would foll Author Jane Kirkpatrick’s new historical novel, Everything She Didn’t Say, reveals the plight of many women, even today. The novel is based on a true story, and knowing Kirkpatrick’s skillful extensive research, there is probably more truth than fiction to this story. The novel takes place in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Carrie, the daughter of a prominent physician, married Robert Strahorn who worked for the Union Pacific railroad. His job was to develop new towns that the railroad would follow on its way west. Robert also wrote books and pamphlets designed to entice people west. Carrie and Robert’s years were filled with adventure, riding for miles by stagecoach or horseback. Although these adventures sound exciting, what they really amounted to were unending days in gritty jolting stagecoaches, days not necessarily ending with hot meals and a decent place to sleep. Carrie yearned for a normal home and children, yet she knew Robert’s dream and dedication to his job when she married him. She just thught it would some day end. In 1911, Carrie wrote a memoir sharing some of the exciting events of the past twenty-five years of shaping the American West with her husband. That book, Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, is still available today. Throughout Everything She Didn’t Say, excerpts from that memoir are highlighted. But also highlighted are Carrie’s private thoughts, revealing and stark, about her struggles to accept her own worth, not to become lost in her husband’s ambition, and the pain and disappointments of a pioneering life. Everything She Didn’t Say is a remarkable novel, a work of deep thought and emotion. I highly recommend this heartfelt historical novel.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aurelia Mast-glick

    So this book provides a classic example of why it's always good to read more than one book by an author. This is the second book by Jane that I have read. The first one, when I looked at my review, I wasn't that impressed by. This book I loved. I can't explain the difference. Both books were based on true events and followed the life of a real life person, but one I enjoyed and one didn't do much for me. Anyway, this is a memoir within a memoir of Carrie Adell Green Strahorn. She wrote a two volu So this book provides a classic example of why it's always good to read more than one book by an author. This is the second book by Jane that I have read. The first one, when I looked at my review, I wasn't that impressed by. This book I loved. I can't explain the difference. Both books were based on true events and followed the life of a real life person, but one I enjoyed and one didn't do much for me. Anyway, this is a memoir within a memoir of Carrie Adell Green Strahorn. She wrote a two volume memoir called "Fifteen thousand Miles by Stage." This is true. Jane took that memoir and created a fictional/true character. Basically she made her a bit more personable, trying to add in real thoughts and feelings. Carrie was very happy to remain in her happy lane as she liked to call it. And truthfully, while she saw some amazing things in her life, I don't know that there are many women who are blissfully content to be moved from location to location at the whim of their husband, never having close friends, never having a home. They would settle in for awhile in a location, but if often seemed like her husband's poor financial decisions would soon cause them to fun fleeing, sometimes about literally in the middle of the night. But I was impressed with Carrie's determination to try and make the best of the situation, to always look for the positive: "That's what I'm known for, being cheery in times of trial." I really enjoyed the book and the style of writing used. And after reading this book, I will definitely be looking for more of Jane's books. I received this book from Revell and was not required to write a positive review.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn Fonseca

    The history behind this book was fascinating. I had never heard of the Strahorns and this book made me want to learn more about them and the history surrounding the Union Pacific and the settling of wild territories. However, I wasn't very excited about the format. It read similar to a memoir with the journal entries and the first person point of view but I found it lacking. I wasn't able to connect with Carrie or any of the other characters. It felt like a lot was missing. It would have been ni The history behind this book was fascinating. I had never heard of the Strahorns and this book made me want to learn more about them and the history surrounding the Union Pacific and the settling of wild territories. However, I wasn't very excited about the format. It read similar to a memoir with the journal entries and the first person point of view but I found it lacking. I wasn't able to connect with Carrie or any of the other characters. It felt like a lot was missing. It would have been nice to know a little more of Carrie's life before she met Robert and how they met, started courting, her emotions when she wasn't able to conceive, how she coped with childlessness, etc. A lot of her feelings are missing as I'm sure, sacrificing her desires for a family and a settled life to follow her husband throughout unsettled territory was not an easy feat. There are some big gaps in between some chapters as well, which leave a big hole in Carrie's story. The character development is not as strong as in other of Ms. Kirkpatrick's novels. I don't feel like I got to know Carrie or Robert as I would have liked. However, I do appreciate that this book was written telling part of the Strahorn's adventures, which I had never heard of before now. The short excerpts of Carrie's book Fifteen Miles by Stage have sparked my interest in wanting to read it. But I do wish the format would have been a little different, more like a novel and less than a memoir. I received a copy of this book from Revell in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed here are entirely my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    The version I read was not the finished product and an ARC. I requested this book because I like Kirkpatrick’s other books I’ve read and I though it sounded interesting. You can tell she always researches her materials well and this book was no exception. This was based off a true story and was a little dry. It also jumped around and was sometimes hard to follow (I’m hoping that’s just because it’s unfinished). I would still have liked to have finished it though as I’m interested in what happens The version I read was not the finished product and an ARC. I requested this book because I like Kirkpatrick’s other books I’ve read and I though it sounded interesting. You can tell she always researches her materials well and this book was no exception. This was based off a true story and was a little dry. It also jumped around and was sometimes hard to follow (I’m hoping that’s just because it’s unfinished). I would still have liked to have finished it though as I’m interested in what happens to “Dell.” At times it seems like her husband Robert doesn’t even really love her, then at other times I see that he does, he’s just a different kind of man. Not everyone could live with him or help him the way she does. They seem like a good match. I hope she ends up standing up more to him and expressing her true desires and dreams to him... and that he actually listens to her. I received a copy from NetGallery and the publisher an exchange for my honest review. I am only going to review this book on Netgallery and Goodreads, because I didn’t finish it. Even though I tried to reload it several times it was very glitchy. Every time I stopped reading it for more then 5 minutes, it would start back at the beginning again. It also wouldn’t let me skip to where I was, and had to turn it slowly page by page. That is the only reason I stopped reading it. After I got about halfway through, it was just too much of a pain.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Beth Withers

    Carrie Adell Strahorn, the main character in this novel, is based upon a real person of the same name. I had not heard of her before, and I thoroughly enjoyed learning about this courageous lady. Her memoir is Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, and I just might have to get a copy. Carrie was married to Robert Strahorn, who went ahead of the Union Pacific Railway, writing pieces to encourage people to settle in the West, often letting them hope the railroad would come through a town, and those inve Carrie Adell Strahorn, the main character in this novel, is based upon a real person of the same name. I had not heard of her before, and I thoroughly enjoyed learning about this courageous lady. Her memoir is Fifteen Thousand Miles by Stage, and I just might have to get a copy. Carrie was married to Robert Strahorn, who went ahead of the Union Pacific Railway, writing pieces to encourage people to settle in the West, often letting them hope the railroad would come through a town, and those investing in it would make certain money, although Robert didn't have the power to determine the location of the rails. Carrie wrote pieces also which were sometimes published under a pseudonym in papers. She gave people more of an idea of what life was really like in the untamed West, rather than just the facts and figures of her husband's writings. My only complaint about this book is that there is more about Carrie's feelings and less about what actually happened. Perhaps there is a copyright issue in there somewhere; I am not sure. Incidents that would have made for good story telling are relegated to little more than an aside comment, leaving me wanting to know more about a creek crossing, or meeting a band of Indians, for example. It's interesting to think of people brave enough to leave the comforts they know to strike out in a wild, virtually unknown place. **This book was sent to me through LibraryThing's Early Reviewers program in exchange for an honest review.**

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