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Anne of Green Gables

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As soon as Anne Shirley arrives at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she is sure she wants to stay forever . . . but will the Cuthberts send her back to to the orphanage? Anne knows she's not what they expected—a skinny girl with fiery red hair and a temper to match. If only she can convince them to let her stay, she'll try very hard not to keep rushing headlon As soon as Anne Shirley arrives at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she is sure she wants to stay forever . . . but will the Cuthberts send her back to to the orphanage? Anne knows she's not what they expected—a skinny girl with fiery red hair and a temper to match. If only she can convince them to let her stay, she'll try very hard not to keep rushing headlong into scrapes and blurting out the first thing that comes to her mind. Anne is not like anyone else, the Cuthberts agree; she is special—a girl with an enormous imagination. This orphan girl dreams of the day when she can call herself Anne of Green Gables.


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As soon as Anne Shirley arrives at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she is sure she wants to stay forever . . . but will the Cuthberts send her back to to the orphanage? Anne knows she's not what they expected—a skinny girl with fiery red hair and a temper to match. If only she can convince them to let her stay, she'll try very hard not to keep rushing headlon As soon as Anne Shirley arrives at the snug white farmhouse called Green Gables, she is sure she wants to stay forever . . . but will the Cuthberts send her back to to the orphanage? Anne knows she's not what they expected—a skinny girl with fiery red hair and a temper to match. If only she can convince them to let her stay, she'll try very hard not to keep rushing headlong into scrapes and blurting out the first thing that comes to her mind. Anne is not like anyone else, the Cuthberts agree; she is special—a girl with an enormous imagination. This orphan girl dreams of the day when she can call herself Anne of Green Gables.

30 review for Anne of Green Gables

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I don't often give books five stars and as I neared the end of this book, I gave some thought to how many stars this book deserved. I've read the Anne of Green Gables series once before - over twenty years ago. In spite of the amount of time that has elapsed, I clearly recall reading the last book in the series very slowly and thinking to myself, "I will be so sad to not be able to read about Anne anymore." When I picked up this book a few days ago to re-read it, I found within a few chapters th I don't often give books five stars and as I neared the end of this book, I gave some thought to how many stars this book deserved. I've read the Anne of Green Gables series once before - over twenty years ago. In spite of the amount of time that has elapsed, I clearly recall reading the last book in the series very slowly and thinking to myself, "I will be so sad to not be able to read about Anne anymore." When I picked up this book a few days ago to re-read it, I found within a few chapters that it was like seeing an old friend. Anne was even more delightful than I recalled, since I now have daughters who share her "scope for imagination," her penchant for large words and her zest for life. Reading about Anne's appreciation for life's loveliness made me appreciate my daughters and long to live more in-the-moment myself. So, I decided that a book that feels like an old friend after twenty years deserves five stars. Anne Shirley must be one of the most delightful characters ever written, largely because she is far from perfect. She makes mistakes, as we all do, but her mistakes are much funnier than my own feel and she makes me see the value in learning from each of them, laughing at them and moving on. Like my middle daughter, there is no lukewarm with Anne. I love that she approaches life enthusiastically, despite have spent a decade belonging to no one. I also like that Anne talks straightforwardly about wanting, seeking and building friendships. Even now, I am hesitant, awkward and scattershot at building relationships. I may meet someone who seems a kindred spirit, but lack the time or, let's be honest, sheer boldness to approach them and seek to build a friendship. We see Anne seek and build relationships not only upon her arrival in Avonlea, but during her time at Queens. One reasons I re-read this book was because two friends recommended it for it's fluency in writing dialogue. Unlike Little Women, which I attempted to read for the writing, this book did not disappoint. The dialogue sounds exactly like each character would sound and it flows smoothly from narration to dialogue and back. In fact, I'm baffled that Little Women routinely makes top 100 lists while Anne of Green Gables is nowhere to be found on the lists of must-read classics. Unlike the Little Women characters who are archetypes rather than three dimensional characters, Anne is a bold a female character who refuses to be categorized. That's exactly why I love her and love this book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    "Dear old world," she murmured, "you are very lovely and I am glad to be alive in you." This quote really accurately depicts how Anne lives her life and what makes you love her as a character. She's stubborn and makes mistakes, but she also has a huge imagination and sees the world as beautiful and full of possibilities. I loved this SO much and I'm sad I never read it before! I love all the characters and the plot, and it's really fun to see Anne grow up through this book. The writing is also rea "Dear old world," she murmured, "you are very lovely and I am glad to be alive in you." This quote really accurately depicts how Anne lives her life and what makes you love her as a character. She's stubborn and makes mistakes, but she also has a huge imagination and sees the world as beautiful and full of possibilities. I loved this SO much and I'm sad I never read it before! I love all the characters and the plot, and it's really fun to see Anne grow up through this book. The writing is also really really lovely. I can't wait to read the sequels and follow Anne's story! This has made it up to my favorite books of all time list, that's for sure. REREAD NOTES I didn't think I could love this book more but somehow I do?? I AM SO EMOTIONAL.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads-no-more

    4.5 stars Anne, my lovely, I feel restored. "Marilla!" Anne sat down on Marilla's gingham lap, took Marilla's lined face between her hands, and looked gravely and tenderly into Marilla's eyes. "I'm not a bit changed—not really. I'm only just pruned down and branched out. The real me—back here—is just the same. It won't make a bit of difference where I go or how much I change outwardly; at heart I shall always be your little Anne, who will love you and Matthew and dear Green Gables more and bette 4.5 stars Anne, my lovely, I feel restored. "Marilla!" Anne sat down on Marilla's gingham lap, took Marilla's lined face between her hands, and looked gravely and tenderly into Marilla's eyes. "I'm not a bit changed—not really. I'm only just pruned down and branched out. The real me—back here—is just the same. It won't make a bit of difference where I go or how much I change outwardly; at heart I shall always be your little Anne, who will love you and Matthew and dear Green Gables more and better every day of her life." Full RTC. Pre-review: You know what? I've been wanting to reread these books for probably a decade, and I'm still (inexplicably) battling my ever present book funk, so I'm just gonna do it. Gilbert Blythe, you were my first and best book boyfriend. See you soon ;)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maxwell

    I never read Anne's story when I was younger, so when I heard that Rachel McAdams was narrating the first in the series I knew I had to give it a go. I'm a sucker for a celebrity-narrated audiobook (if you haven't checked out Maggie Gyllenhaal's reading of The Bell Jar, do that now!). It's wonderful to read a story that, for the most part, is extremely uplifting. There's hardly anything truly terrible that happens in this story, and that's quite refreshing. Granted, it is a children's novel and I never read Anne's story when I was younger, so when I heard that Rachel McAdams was narrating the first in the series I knew I had to give it a go. I'm a sucker for a celebrity-narrated audiobook (if you haven't checked out Maggie Gyllenhaal's reading of The Bell Jar, do that now!). It's wonderful to read a story that, for the most part, is extremely uplifting. There's hardly anything truly terrible that happens in this story, and that's quite refreshing. Granted, it is a children's novel and from the early 1900's—so it has that moralistic quality to it wherein each incident Anne undergoes resolves itself with a lesson learned. But it was delightful, and Anne's optimism is contagious. Rachel McAdams also does a great job at encapsulating that attitude; I felt like I could hear her smile. If, like me, you've never given Anne's story a chance, I can highly recommend the audiobook route. And I'm definitely going to continue listening to this series, especially when I'm in need of a pick-me-up.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Candi

    "Excitement hung around Anne like a garment, shone in her eyes, kindled in every feature." Oh, what sheer pleasure it was to spend just a moment in time with Anne and her delightful companions in this little classic. What pure joy to catch a glimpse of the beauty of Prince Edward Island. I am likely one of the last persons on earth… well, on Goodreads at least… to read this novel. What in the world was I waiting for?! As a child and adolescent, I wrongly assumed that this book would be of no inte "Excitement hung around Anne like a garment, shone in her eyes, kindled in every feature." Oh, what sheer pleasure it was to spend just a moment in time with Anne and her delightful companions in this little classic. What pure joy to catch a glimpse of the beauty of Prince Edward Island. I am likely one of the last persons on earth… well, on Goodreads at least… to read this novel. What in the world was I waiting for?! As a child and adolescent, I wrongly assumed that this book would be of no interest to me. I wasn’t a ‘girly girl’ and surely this was written for ‘that sort’ of reader, right? Wrong! By the time I was old enough to know better, I thought I had grown too mature in years to pick this one up. Wrong again. The ‘sort’ of reader that this does appeal to however: one who appreciates exquisite writing and vibrant characters, one who relishes being steeped in another time and place, and one who enjoys an all-out fantastic story. In short, this book should satisfy nearly everyone! You can’t help but fall in love with Anne. She is the friend you have always longed for, the daughter that will bring that much-needed light in your life, that student that any teacher would be proud to instruct. She is funny, imaginative, bright, and a regular chatterbox. She laments about her red hair, apologizes for being a ‘great trial’ to Marilla, and always manages to see the positive in most everything. However, she does maintain a long-standing rivalry with her peer, Gilbert Blythe. "She was as intense in her hatreds as in her loves." Nothing is ever lukewarm when it comes to Anne’s feelings. There were moments I wanted to laugh with her and moments when I wanted to cry. When she first arrived at Green Gables, Anne learned that it had all been a mistake. For, Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert meant to adopt a young boy to help with the chores. A little girl was not needed. It nearly crushed me when Anne fell in love with Green Gables only to find that she must surely be turned away and carted straight back to the orphanage. "Have you ever noticed what cheerful things brooks are? They’re always laughing… I shall always like to remember that there is a brook at Green Gables even if I never see it again." What transpires after this will melt even the most hardened hearts. Some might say this book is too wholesome, too charming, and perhaps too unrealistic. I have to say that I don’t believe those are good enough reasons to skip reading this enchanting novel! It didn’t take place just yesterday so I didn’t expect the trials and tribulations of today’s day and age. The events do occur on an idyllic island, so I felt the beautiful scenery I was immersed in was wholly believable. Anne is not a perfect little girl and each character has their share of flaws. Not every story has to be full of doom and gloom to get all the stars! Sometimes one just needs to sit back, relax, and just surrender to the small pleasures in life. We could all use a lesson from Anne’s book of optimism here and there! "Dear old world, you are lovely, and I am glad to be alive in you."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Raeleen Lemay

    I'm so glad I've finally read this book! I started reading it as a young girl, and got distracted by the 10 other books I was reading at the time and never finished it... Anyhow, it was such a fun read, and I'm sure I'll read it again someday!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cait • A Page with a View

    Never have I ever related more to a fictional character than Anne. This is just the most adorable, heartwarming book ever and I honestly don't think I ever read it before this week! I have the movies practically memorized and they follow the books perfectly, so there was nothing terribly new in this story. The only obvious difference was that Gilbert isn't in the book as much. But seeing Anne ramble on and on for pages more than made up for that. I just have to stick some of my favorite quotes i Never have I ever related more to a fictional character than Anne. This is just the most adorable, heartwarming book ever and I honestly don't think I ever read it before this week! I have the movies practically memorized and they follow the books perfectly, so there was nothing terribly new in this story. The only obvious difference was that Gilbert isn't in the book as much. But seeing Anne ramble on and on for pages more than made up for that. I just have to stick some of my favorite quotes in here: "When people mean to be good to you, you don't mind very much when they're not quite–always." "One can't stay sad very long in such an interesting world, can one?" "Isn't it a wonderful morning? The world looks like something God imagined for His own pleasure, doesn't it? ...I'm so glad I live in a world where there are white frosts, aren't you?" "Isn't it nice to think that tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it yet?" "It's nicer to think dear, pretty thoughts and keep them in one's heart like treasures. I don't like to have them laughed at or wondered over." "Oh, it's delightful to have ambitions. I'm so glad I have such a lot. And there never seems to be any end to them– that's the best of it. Just as soon as you attain to one ambition you see another one glittering higher up still. It does make life so interesting." "I like people who make me love them. It saves me so much trouble in making myself love them." "Ruby Gillis says when she grows up she's going to have ever so many beaus on the string and have them all crazy about her; but I think that would be too exciting. I'd rather just have one in his right mind." "Dear old world... you are very lovely, and I am glad to be alive in you." So if you've seen the movies, you're not really missing any of the book. But this story will never get old and now it can go on my favorites list! Because I seriously am Anne:

  8. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    What a lovely little book! There were a million excerpts I wanted to add but maybe at a later date. Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐾🐺

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This story is cute, touching, heart-warming, tear-jerking. In other words, a classic! The target audience is definitely not me. I would say it would be perfect for a teenage girl living in Canada in the early 1900s. That makes sense, because that is exactly what Anne is! However, the point of this obvious detail is that sometimes it is fun to read a classic and try to put your mind in the mindset of who it was written for at the time. A couple of the storylines seemed silly or to not make sense, This story is cute, touching, heart-warming, tear-jerking. In other words, a classic! The target audience is definitely not me. I would say it would be perfect for a teenage girl living in Canada in the early 1900s. That makes sense, because that is exactly what Anne is! However, the point of this obvious detail is that sometimes it is fun to read a classic and try to put your mind in the mindset of who it was written for at the time. A couple of the storylines seemed silly or to not make sense, but if I stopped and changed my mindset, it would click. A bit of a history lesson combined with a well written story. If you haven't read this before, give it a shot and maybe you will find your inner early 1900s Canadian teenager!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    October 2018 read with the Retro Reads group! This is a classic 1908 novel about an orphan girl who comes to the Prince Edward Island home of aging brother and sister Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert (mistakenly - they wanted a boy to help Matthew with chores). After an initial kerfuffle about sending Anne back to the orphanage and getting the boy they had intended, hearts are softened, and Anne proceeds to upend their lives ... in what turns out to be very good ways for everyone involved. Anne is e October 2018 read with the Retro Reads group! This is a classic 1908 novel about an orphan girl who comes to the Prince Edward Island home of aging brother and sister Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert (mistakenly - they wanted a boy to help Matthew with chores). After an initial kerfuffle about sending Anne back to the orphanage and getting the boy they had intended, hearts are softened, and Anne proceeds to upend their lives ... in what turns out to be very good ways for everyone involved. Anne is eleven years old when she first comes to Green Gables, and the novel follows her adventures over the next five years. It’s kind of an episodic novel, with memorable characters. Anne is a chatterbox with a vivid imagination, passionate and sincere. Marilla and Matthew are drawn so well that I feel like I really know them (though it's disconcerting to realize that Matthew in the book has a long beard. My mind's eye refuses to see him that way, LOL. That miniseries has co-opted my imagination). And then there's Gilbert, who lives to regret some initial teasing about Anne's hair. The novel has a healthy sense of humor that sets it apart from most literature of this period and keeps it from being too sticky sweet. It’s really so charming, with great insights into human nature, and lovely descriptions of P.E.I. It's a feel-good story and a total comfort read! Anne of Green Gables spawned a slew of sequels and five other related novels (not to mention any number of film and TV adaptations). Not all of the sequels are great reads like this one - they start getting progressively more sappy - but I do recommend the first four books in this series if you liked this one.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Greendale

    Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. Eleven-year-old Anne Shirley is an orphan girl in need of a family. She may be scrawny and freckled with red hair but she’s also loving and bright with imagination. When she’s mistakenly sent to Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, elderly siblings who plan to adopt a young boy to help around their farm, Anne faces the prospect of securing a home and a loving family – if she can prove she’s worth keeping. First pub Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. Eleven-year-old Anne Shirley is an orphan girl in need of a family. She may be scrawny and freckled with red hair but she’s also loving and bright with imagination. When she’s mistakenly sent to Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, elderly siblings who plan to adopt a young boy to help around their farm, Anne faces the prospect of securing a home and a loving family – if she can prove she’s worth keeping. First published in 1908, Anne of Green Gables has long enchanted readers, young and old alike. How could it not with such an effervescent heroine at its heart? Anne is a delightful companion with which to explore the splendor of Green Gables and the quaint town of Avonlea (a fictional town modeled after Montgomery’s hometown of Cavendish in the maritime province of Prince Edward Island, Canada). Montgomery crafts such stunning descriptions of the terrain that her prose risks outshining Anne. With descriptive language that titillates the senses and the imagination, Montgomery brings the rustic setting of Avonlea to life. Gypsy winds, perfumed air, dew-wet ferns, woodland blooms, and trees adorned with glimmering gossamer are just the beginning of the wondrous discoveries made by Anne during her “raptured voyages of exploration.” It was a pretty road, running along between snug farmsteads, with now and again a bit of balsamy fir wood to drive through or a hollow where wild plums hung out their filmy bloom. The air was sweet with the breath of many apple orchards and the meadows sloped away in the distance to horizon mists of pearl and purple. Wild cherry trees and rose bushes grow unfettered, and the birds are always singing, but one gets the sense that Anne Shirley could find happiness and adventure no matter where she goes, whether she be surrounded by beauty or not. Even though Anne’s story is recounted through an omniscient narrator, readers experience wonder of the world as if through Anne’s eyes. At every turn, her personality overflows and her indomitable spirit knows no bounds. She’s an eloquent child with an adoration for big words; “if you have big ideas,” Anne insists, “you have to use big words to express them.” She speaks in a refined manner that belies her age and can always be counted on to impart wisdom. You can nearly always enjoy things if you make up your mind firmly that you will. Anne is a loquacious child with long-winded stints of dialogue. This trait was less noticeable when reading the book as a young girl and proved slightly annoying during this re-read as an adult. It’s a defining quality of Anne’s personality, however, something one cannot help but eventually love about her. There’s a comforting predictability to Anne’s bubbling personality; readers can always be certain that her uplifting thoughts and sophisticated proclamations will boil over and spill from her mouth with abandon. Matthew Cuthbert, much to his own surprise, finds Anne’s chatter quite pleasant. Like most quiet folks he liked talkative people when they were willing to do the talking themselves and did not expect him to keep up his end of it. Be he had never expected to enjoy the society of a little girl. Matthew Cuthbert is described as an “odd-looking personage” with an “ungainly figure.” He’s a shy, quiet man who is made uncomfortable by most women, taking exception only to his sister and their gossipy neighbor who lives a quarter-mile away, Mrs. Rachel Lynde. Women were bad enough in all conscience, but little girls were worse. He detested the way they had of sidling past him timidly, with sidewise glances, as if they expected him to gobble them up at a mouthful if they ventured to say a word. He’s quite taken aback to discover a girl in place of the boy he expected to retrieve from the train station, but he’s too kindhearted (and too cowardly) to leave her behind. He decides to escort her back to Green Gables so that his sister can “tell this child with the glowing eyes that there had been a mistake.” Marilla Cuthbert exudes none of the warmth found in her brother. She’s a practical woman, tall and thin “with angles and without curves,” who furrows her brows at wastefulness and excess. Here sat Marilla Cuthbert, when she sat at all, always slightly distrustful of sunshine, which seemed to her too dancing and irresponsible a thing for a world which was meant to be taken seriously. Marilla insists that Anne be returned to the orphanage. When Anne asks if Marilla would keep her if she were a more attractive child, Marilla replies simply, “No. We want a boy to help Matthew on the farm. A girl would be of no use to us.” Despite her stern countenance, Marilla agrees to accommodate Anne for the night and decides that, rather than sleep on the couch prepared in the kitchen chamber for the anticipated boy, Anne should sleep in the east gable room. While Anne sleeps, Matthew and Marilla discuss what to do about the “odd little figure” with the “long braids of red hair and the eager luminous eyes.” Marilla is quite determined not to keep her, while Matthew reveals he’s already warming to Anne’s irresistible charms. “Matthew Cuthbert, you don’t mean to say you think we ought to keep her!” Marilla’s astonishment could not have been greater if Matthew had expressed a predilection for standing on his head. “Well now, no, I suppose not – not exactly,” stammered Matthew, uncomfortably driven into a corner for his precise meaning. “I suppose – we could hardly be expected to keep her.” “I should say not. What good would she be to us?” “We might be some good to her,” said Matthew suddenly and unexpectedly. And therein lies Anne’s challenge: She must make herself useful around the farm and prove herself worthy of a home at Green Gables by staying out of trouble. But Anne and trouble go together like spring flowers and honey bees. Be it contending with Marilla’s practicality, navigating the politics of a new school, solving the mystery of pesky boys, or trying to make new friends as an ungainly orphan girl, trouble is never far behind the efforts of Anne Shirley. If Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert can find it in their hearts to cherish this little girl, their lives will be made richer for it. And if Anne can stay out of trouble, she might just find a loving home in a beautiful place. With lovely prose and an unforgettable heroine, Anne of Green Gables is an endearing book brimming with scope for the imagination.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Yaz *The Reading Girl*

    Finally: Full review written December 17th, 2013 and edited the 19th:) ***5 beautiful "Kindred Spirits" stars!!*** Sighs...Anne of Green Gables and her crazy doings will forever stay in my heart <3. Can there be such a crazy, beautiful, kindred spirit soul as Anne? No, I do not think so (there are two exceptions: Miranda Cheever and Penelope :D). This precious book is the first out of the many books in the Anne of Green Gables series. I think many of you know what Anne of Green Gables is about Finally: Full review written December 17th, 2013 and edited the 19th:) ***5 beautiful "Kindred Spirits" stars!!*** Sighs...Anne of Green Gables and her crazy doings will forever stay in my heart <3. Can there be such a crazy, beautiful, kindred spirit soul as Anne? No, I do not think so (there are two exceptions: Miranda Cheever and Penelope :D). This precious book is the first out of the many books in the Anne of Green Gables series. I think many of you know what Anne of Green Gables is about or have seen her movies...if you haven't then read on! Anne: Anne is an orphan girl who was adopted by Marilla and Matthew Curthbert...let's say she was meant to be a boy. She is an odd looking little girl with fierce red hair, freckles, gray eyes, and pale skin. She is a full kindred spirit and very imaginative. Everybody suspects that she will be a disappointment but she is not. From adventures,imagination, to meeting new friends, to accidents, to love, being smart, and turning into a beauty Anne's life is not what she ever thought it would be. “It's been my experience that you can nearly always enjoy things if you make up your mind firmly that you will.” She has a rival...the amazing Gilbert. Yes, I fell in love with him ;). Gilbert: Ever since he pulled her hair and called her carrots Gilbert and Anne have never been the same. Competitions, glances, rivalry, ignorance,and hate has driven the two to not talk to each other. But as time passes by and with the help of her best friend Diana, Anne has let that hate slide away and has allowed a little bit of likeness to come in through her heart towards Gilbert. And maybe..maybe love will happen. But besides that, Anne has her studies to worry about. She has her beloved best friend Diana, and she has her cold but kind Marilla and sweet Matthew: __________________________________ __________________________________ __________________________________ But as she grows up Anne's life takes a turn of a grown women and she experiences how life truly is...harsh, unfair, and sad. But also wonderful. But there is something...a place that she will always remember and never forget...her Green Gables. “I'm so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers.” “It's not what the world holds for you. It's what you bring to it.” ______________________________________ Anne of Green Gables is a beautiful book. It is one of my favorite classics and will forever stay in my heart. It is full of life, love, innocence, beauty, finding yourself,forgiveness, growing up, and it is tremendously funny! She is one of my favorite heroines and she is such a great example. I think you all know the reason why I gave this 5 stars and I don't really need to explain myself that much :D. But if you have never read this you should. Anne of Green Gables is a beautiful journey of a young girl and her imagination. “Because when you are imagining, you might as well imagine something worth while.” *All the pictures here I have created and added the effects,coloring, and words(except gifs and the collage up there).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Loretta

    One I really should have read when I was younger. 😕

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Anne of Green Gables, L.M. Montgomery Anne of Green Gables is a 1908 novel by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery (published as L. M. Montgomery). Written for all ages, it has been considered a children's novel since the mid-twentieth century. It recounts the adventures of Anne Shirley, an 11-year-old orphan girl who is mistakenly sent to Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, a middle-aged brother and sister who had intended to adopt a boy to help them on their farm in the fictional town of Avonlea on Anne of Green Gables, L.M. Montgomery Anne of Green Gables is a 1908 novel by Canadian author Lucy Maud Montgomery (published as L. M. Montgomery). Written for all ages, it has been considered a children's novel since the mid-twentieth century. It recounts the adventures of Anne Shirley, an 11-year-old orphan girl who is mistakenly sent to Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, a middle-aged brother and sister who had intended to adopt a boy to help them on their farm in the fictional town of Avonlea on Prince Edward Island. The novel recounts how Anne makes her way with the Cuthberts, in school, and within the town. عنوانها: آنی شرلی در گرین گیبلز؛ آنی رویای سبز؛ آنی در گرین گیبل؛ دختر خانه سبز؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و پنجم ماه سپتامبر سال 2012 میلادی عنوان: آن شرلی با موهای قرمز؛ نویسنده: ال.ام. مونتگمری؛ مترجم: امیرحسین علمشاهی؛ ویراستار: محمد سیفی؛ تبریز رهیافت، 1379؛ شابک: 9649020845؛ عنوانهای دیگر: آنی رویای سبز؛ آنی در گرین گیبل؛ دختر خانه سبز؛ موضوع: داستانها و ادبیات کانادا - سده 20 م عنوان: آنی شرلی در گرین گیبلز - کتاب اول ؛ نویسنده: لوسی ماد ال.ام. مونتگمری؛ مترجم: سارا قدیانی؛ تهران، قدیانی، 1386؛ در 495 ص، نقشه، مجموعه آنی شرلی - کتاب اول؛ چاپ دوم 1387؛ چاپ سوم 1388؛ چاپ هفتم 1392؛ شابک: 9789645365880؛ آنی شرلی در گرین گیبلز، نخستین جلد از مجموعه داستان‌های «آن شرلی»، اثر: لوسی ماد مونتگمری است. در این کتاب، آن شرلی یک دختربچه دوازده ساله، پا به «گرین گیبلز» می‌گذارد. «ماریلا»، و «متیو کاتبرت»، خواهر و برادری مزرعه‌ دار، و صاحب «گرین گیبلز» هستند. آنها تصمیم می‌گیرند، سرپرستی پسربچه ی ده-یازده ساله‌ ای را، به عهده بگیرند، اما کسیکه مسئولیت داشته، یتیم مورد نظر آنها را، از یتیم‌خانه به «گرین گیبلز» ببرد، به اشتباه، دختربچه‌ ای به نام: «آن شرلی» را، که والدینش را در سه ماهگی، از دست داده، به «گرین گیبلز» می‌آورد، و «آنی»، در آنجا ماندگار می‌شود، و به جای کمک به «متیو» در کشاورزی، به «ماریلا»، در خانه‌ داری، یاری می‌کند، و ماجراهایی به وجود میاورد. او دوستی به نام: «داینا بری»، دارد، دو دوست، از هم جدا میشوند، ولی آن دو هماره، سعی دارند، به دوستی خویش پایبند بمانند. ... ا. شربیانی

  15. 5 out of 5

    Celeste

    Full review now posted! I so desperately wish I would’ve met Anne when I was a child, because we would’ve been bosom friends. However, I didn’t first read this book until I was in my 20s, and I was really missing out on something wonderful. But better late than never, right? I’ve since read this book 4 times, and I’ve loved it more every time I’ve read it. Anne Shirley reminds me so much of myself as a child, minus the red hair. She’s doggedly optimistic, though she can be incredibly dramatic when Full review now posted! I so desperately wish I would’ve met Anne when I was a child, because we would’ve been bosom friends. However, I didn’t first read this book until I was in my 20s, and I was really missing out on something wonderful. But better late than never, right? I’ve since read this book 4 times, and I’ve loved it more every time I’ve read it. Anne Shirley reminds me so much of myself as a child, minus the red hair. She’s doggedly optimistic, though she can be incredibly dramatic when things don’t go her way. She’s always getting into scrapes that seem impossible, even though she always means well. She’s a dreamer and a lover of nature and novels. I was all of those things as a child, and I think I’ve done a pretty good job of maintaining those characteristics as an adult (even the propensity for getting into trouble, unfortunately). Anne’s greatest gift is her imagination, and so is mine. I’ve visited thousands of different worlds and time periods through that imagination, and it’s one of the things I’m the most thankful for. Anne adores Green Gables, the little farm where she comes to reside in Avonlea. She loves Matthew and Marilla, the siblings who take her in. Anne is one of the biggest nature nuts I’ve ever come across, and I love how she renames things with more “appropriate” (in other words, more romantic) names, such as The Lake of Shining Waters instead of Barry’s Pond. I can’t express to you how very “me” that is! When I was a little girl, I was always naming parts of our land and pretending they were far away places. I have always been incredibly thankful to have been raised in the country, where my imagination could run wild every single day. I’m thankful for spring flowers, summer fruit, rambunctious goats, and mockingbird song outside my window. I’m thankful for summers in the pool and for wild thunderstorms as I go to sleep. I’m thankful for the nearness of my family and the distance of the rest of the world. I’m thankful for the freedom to take a long walk without worrying about my safety. And I see that same thankfulness in Anne Shirley. We are without a doubt kindred spirits, even if she is fictional. Another thing I have in common with Anne is a passion for stories, both the reading and the telling of them. I know of nothing else that can transport a person and allow them to live a thousand lives instead of only the life they’ve been given. There is something magical about the ability of letters on a page to create something new in the minds of whoever reads them. Anne of Green Gables is no different. I felt completely at home in Avonlea, and I thoroughly enjoyed following Anne’s adventures (and misadventures) through her late childhood. If I could reach into the world of fiction and adopt any literary orphan, Anne would be one of my top two picks alongside Harry Potter. I have to confess, though, I’m pretty sure Anne would come out on top if I could only choose one. She’s enchanting and lives life to the fullest, and she’s a much better person than she believes herself to be. I love Anne with all of my heart, and I can’t wait to share her with my niece. She’s a character that I’ll keep revisiting for the rest of my life, and I can’t imagine ever tiring of her. Kindred spirits are hard to find, but I definitely found one in Anne of Green Gables. Also, isn't this edition lovely?! For more of my reviews, as well as my own fiction and thoughts on life, check out my blog, Celestial Musings.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    A Beautiful Dreamer As charming as she is Anne of Green Gables makes you fall in love with her not for her wit, but for her wholehearted love of life and the beauty of this world. She hates and loves with intense power for a little girl. I cried and smiled often during this story and I am so glad I finally read it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Apatt

    “Oh, I don’t mean just the tree; of course it’s lovely—yes, it’s radiantly lovely—it blooms as if it meant it—but I meant everything, the garden and the orchard and the brook and the woods, the whole big dear world. Don’t you feel as if you just loved the world on a morning like this? And I can hear the brook laughing all the way up here. Have you ever noticed what cheerful things brooks are? They’re always laughing. Even in winter-time I’ve heard them under the ice. I’m so glad there’s a brook “Oh, I don’t mean just the tree; of course it’s lovely—yes, it’s radiantly lovely—it blooms as if it meant it—but I meant everything, the garden and the orchard and the brook and the woods, the whole big dear world. Don’t you feel as if you just loved the world on a morning like this? And I can hear the brook laughing all the way up here. Have you ever noticed what cheerful things brooks are? They’re always laughing. Even in winter-time I’ve heard them under the ice. I’m so glad there’s a brook near Green Gables. Perhaps you think it doesn’t make any difference to me when you’re not going to keep me, but it does. I shall always like to remember that there is a brook at Green Gables even if I never see it again. If there wasn’t a brook I’d be haunted by the uncomfortable feeling that there ought to be one. I’m not in the depths of despair this morning. I never can be in the morning. Isn’t it a splendid thing that there are mornings? But I feel very sad. I’ve just been imagining that it was really me you wanted after all and that I was to stay here for ever and ever. It was a great comfort while it lasted. But the worst of imagining things is that the time comes when you have to stop and that hurts.” I swear this is a rare French edition of Anne of Green Gables: I jest, but Anne's motormouth gabbing at Green Gables almost unmanned me. Not only does she never shut up, the twee nonsense she was carping on and on about made me cringe so hard I thought I was going to morph into an accordion. Fiddlesticks indeed! I did consider dropping the book after a few pages of Anne’s mind boggling loquaciousness but something about the book grabbed me when I wasn't looking. There is something rather compelling about the narrative which I could not quite put my finger on at that point, so I kept on reading. I am glad I did. This is going to make me sound terribly ignorant but I never heard of Anne of Green Gables until I read that Netflix was about to air a new adaptation of it. This piqued my interest because it is clearly not a kickass show like most of their recent series. Then I looked up the book on Librivox.org and I found that they have an audiobook of it, read by the excellent Karen Savage. That sealed the deal for me; it is free to read (or listen to) after all, there is no risk in giving it a shot. First published in 1908 Anne of Green Gables is about an orphan named Anne Shirley who is adopted by an old woman called Marilla Cuthbert and her brother Matthew. They wanted to adopt a boy to help Matthew with his farm work but through some kind of snafu, the orphanage sent them a girl instead. Marilla wants to send her back immediately but kindhearted Matt enjoys listening to Anne’s crazy-ass chatter. Soon, however, Anne’s peculiar charms begin to get under her skin and she changes her mind. So Anne gets to live with them at their Green Gables house in Avonlea, a little town on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Pastoral mayhem ensues. Anne and her BFF Diana, art by Kasia1989 It took longer with me than with Marilla but Anne eventually got under my skin too. In spite of being bloody irritating she is interesting and her “joie de vivre”, fearlessness and optimism are infectious. I also enjoy the episodic scrapes she gets into over several chapters: almost breaking her neck, almost drowning, accidentally dyeing her hair green, breaking a slate over a boy's head etc. In George Elliott's lovely Silas Marner Elliott mentions an “unfolding of the soul” that resonates with me, it describes the life-changing effect that the introduction of a child into your life has on your perspective, your attitude, your behavior, and your very soul. There is an identical process going on in Anne of Green Gables with the hitherto terse and practical Marilla. I love this theme and enjoyed reading about her gradual transformation. As for Anne’s nonsensical chatter I become desensitized to it after a while and I was happy to let Anne be Anne. The timeline of the book also spans more years than I expected, I thought it was going to be about Anne getting into scrapes after scrapes until the book ends somehow, and that would have been alright with me. However, it turns out that the book depicts Anne’s coming of age, her gradual development from the age of eleven to sixteen. By the end of the book, Anne is much more mature and not so manic. There is a lighthearted and warm tone to Lucy Maud Montgomery which is a pleasure to read. This is “a book for all ages” so it is not exactly challenging to read. The characterization is very well done. The central characters are all believable and even lovable. The book actually becomes quite poignant towards the end and I closed the book with a happy sigh. There are eight sequels to this book I doubt I will read them all but I would be quite happy to check in on Anne again before too long. Notes: • I am a fan of Ms. Karen Savage’s audiobook narrations, she has such a pleasant reading voice. Her narration of Anne of Green Gables is her best yet. Her love for this book really comes through in her enthusiastic and passionate delivery. I am ever so grateful. (Download page). • Anne of Green Gables became so popular and such an important symbol of freedom in Poland that the Polish army issued a copy to every soldier before WWII. • Anne of Green Gables is a sort of Canadian Secret Garden or Silas Marner. • This book is not as widely read as I thought, my extremely well read BFF Cecily has never heard of it until this review, which probably means at least 50% of the world's reading population haven't. Have a look at the Netflix trailer, see if it's your thing (though there's more angst in the TV show than in the book). • Ten things Anne of Green Gables taught this Guardian journo. • Netflix’s adaptation (called Anne with an “E”) has been described as “gritty”, the grits are of their own manufacture; there is about as much grit in Anne of Green Gables as you would find in an average glass of milk. Amybeth McNulty who plays Anne is a fantastic young actress, her portrayal of Anne is top notched. The show looks good but I have to say I don't like the additional dark materials they put in, I think it is tonally at odds with the spirit of the book. I have seen a couple of episodes so far and a fairly minor incident in the book is blown up into a huge melodrama with a galloping horse chasing a train! (See message #17 by Tracey below for more details. Thanks, Tracey! 🤗) • It is called Anne with an “E” because that is her badass spelling of it, and she insists the E is always included even when people are vocalizing the name. • A minor complaint. Anne’s acrimonious relationship with Gilbert Blythe (who she whacks on the head with a slate) goes on too long on too trivial a basis to be reasonable or believable. I mean, he calls her carrot once and that started five years of animosity? Quotes: “The long platform was almost deserted; the only living creature in sight being a girl who was sitting on a pile of shingles at the extreme end. Matthew, barely noting that it was a girl, sidled past her as quickly as possible without looking at her. Had he looked he could hardly have failed to notice the tense rigidity and expectation of her attitude and expression. She was sitting there waiting for something or somebody and, since sitting and waiting was the only thing to do just then, she sat and waited with all her might and main.” “Listen to the trees talking in their sleep,” she whispered, as he lifted her to the ground. “What nice dreams they must have!” “Matthew, much to his own surprise, was enjoying himself. Like most quiet folks he liked talkative people when they were willing to do the talking themselves and did not expect him to keep up his end of it. But he had never expected to enjoy the society of a little girl. Women were bad enough in all conscience, but little girls were worse. He detested the way they had of sidling past him timidly, with sidewise glances, as if they expected him to gobble them up at a mouthful if they ventured to say a word. That was the Avonlea type of well-bred little girl. But this freckled witch was very different, and although he found it rather difficult for his slower intelligence to keep up with her brisk mental processes he thought that he “kind of liked her chatter.” But they shouldn’t call that lovely place the Avenue. There is no meaning in a name like that. They should call it—let me see—the White Way of Delight. Isn’t that a nice imaginative name? When I don’t like the name of a place or a person I always imagine a new one and always think of them so. There was a girl at the asylum whose name was Hepzibah Jenkins, but I always imagined her as Rosalia DeVere. Other people may call that place the Avenue, but I shall always call it the White Way of Delight. Japanese book cover Anime

  18. 4 out of 5

    James

    Book Review 3+ of 5 stars to Anne of Green Gables, the first book in a series by L.M. Montgomery, written in 1902. I read this book nearly 30 years ago and had to refresh my memory a little, before writing the review. I'd forgotten it was part of a whole series. I read more than one, but not sure which other ones. I recall this first one... a tale about an orphan girl, acclimating to a new family, meeting friends and neighbors. On the outskirts, it's a coming-of-age tale about a young girl be Book Review 3+ of 5 stars to Anne of Green Gables, the first book in a series by L.M. Montgomery, written in 1902. I read this book nearly 30 years ago and had to refresh my memory a little, before writing the review. I'd forgotten it was part of a whole series. I read more than one, but not sure which other ones. I recall this first one... a tale about an orphan girl, acclimating to a new family, meeting friends and neighbors. On the outskirts, it's a coming-of-age tale about a young girl becoming a woman and learning about the realities of life. It's both a funny book to read and an educational one with some lessons. It's something every kid should read, just to understand how good they have it... or if they are adopted, to learn how to deal with it. Anne's a beautiful person, forgetting age for a few seconds. And whenever she's around, it sorta feels like the comforts of home. If you haven't sampled it, read one of the books in the series just to see what life was like for a girl like her over a century ago. It'll be a positive read, even so many years later. About Me For those new to me or my reviews... here's the scoop: I read A LOT. I write A LOT. And now I blog A LOT. First the book review goes on Goodreads, and then I send it on over to my WordPress blog at https://thisismytruthnow.com, where you'll also find TV & Film reviews, the revealing and introspective 365 Daily Challenge and lots of blogging about places I've visited all over the world. And you can find all my social media profiles to get the details on the who/what/when/where and my pictures. Leave a comment and let me know what you think. Vote in the poll and ratings. Thanks for stopping by. Note: All written content is my original creation and copyrighted to me, but the graphics and images were linked from other sites and belong to them. Many thanks to their original creators.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Penrose

    Ive decided that instead of reviewing this book, I will copy my favorite passages....passages that capture what I love about the book..... Page 180 describes Anne perfectly, "The downfall of some dear hope or plan plunged Anne into "deeps of affliction." The fulfilment thereof exalted her to dizzy realms of delight." I love the way Anne thinks...I love the way she jumps from thing to thing in a frenzy of thoughts..... Page 44 the chapter begins..."Do you know," said Anne confidently, "I've made up Ive decided that instead of reviewing this book, I will copy my favorite passages....passages that capture what I love about the book..... Page 180 describes Anne perfectly, "The downfall of some dear hope or plan plunged Anne into "deeps of affliction." The fulfilment thereof exalted her to dizzy realms of delight." I love the way Anne thinks...I love the way she jumps from thing to thing in a frenzy of thoughts..... Page 44 the chapter begins..."Do you know," said Anne confidently, "I've made up my mind to enjoy this drive. It's been my experience that you can nearly always enjoy things if you make up your mind that you will. Of course, you must make it up firmly. I am not going to think about going back to the asylum while we're having our drive. I'm just going to think about the drive. Oh, look, there's one little early wild rose out! Isn't is lovely? Don't you think it would be nice if roses could talk? I'm sure they would tell us such lovely things. And isn't pink the most bewitching color in the world? I love it, but I can't wear it. Redheaded people can't wear pink, not even in imagination. Did you ever know of anybody whose hair was red when she was young, but got to be another color when she grew up?" Page 123 ..."I'm so glad I live in a world where there are Octobers. It would be terrible if we just skipped from September to November, wouldn't it? Look at these maple branches. Don't they give you a thrill-several thrills?"... I just love the writing in general...the choice of words is splendid Page 116 ...."But spruce groves are seductive and yellow nuts of gum beguiling... Page 147 "The warning seemed not unnecessary, so uplifted and aerial was Anne's expression and attitude as she sprang to her feet, her face irradiated with the flame of her spirit." Page 285 "But Anne with her elbows on the window sill, her soft cheek laid against her clasped hands, and her eyes filled with visions, looked out unheedingly across city roof and spire to that glorious dome of sunset sky and wove her dreams of a possible future from the golden tissue of youth's own optimism. All the beyond was hers with its possibilities lurking rosily in the oncoming years-each year a rose of promise to be woven into an immortal chaplet." Page 261 "Anne was sitting at her open window, for the time forgetful of the woes of examinations and the cares of the world, as she drank in the beauty of the summer dusk, sweet-scented with flower-breaths from the garden below and sibilant and rustling from the stirs of poplars. The eastern sky above the firs was flushed faintly pink from the reflection of the west, and Anne was wondering dreamily if the spirit of color looked like that, when she saw Diana come flying down through the firs, over the log bridge, and up the slope, with a fluttering newspaper in her hand." The descritions of nature cannot be beat... Page 147 "Anne came dancing home in the purple winter twilight across the snowy places. Afar in the southwest wwas the great shimmering, pearl-like sparkle of an evening star in a sky that was pale golden and ethereal rose over gleaming white spaces and dark glens of spruce. The tinkles of sleigh bells among the snowy hills came like elfin chimes through the frosty aie, but their music was not seeter than the song in Anne's heart and on her lips." Page 271 "Oh, it was good to be out agin in the purity and silence of the night! How great and still and wonderful everything was, with the murmur of the sea sounding through it and the darkling cliffs beyond like grim giants guarding enchanted coasts." Page 123 "October was a beautiful month at Green Gables, when the birches in the hollow turned as golden as sunshine and the maples behind the orchard were royal crimson and the wild cherry trees along the lane put on the loveliest shades of dark red and bronzy green, while the fields sunned themselves in aftermaths." And of course, how could you not love Anne's wisdom on the subject of growing up... Page 233 "That's the worst of growing up, and I'm begining to realize it. The things you wanted so much when you were a child don't seem half so wonderful to you when you get them." Page 251 "But dare I say ther'll be other things to worry me. They keep coming up new all the time-things to perplex you, you know. You settle on question and there's another right after. There are so many things to be thought over and decided when you're begining to grow up. It keeps me busy all the time thinking them over and deciding whats right. It's a serious thing to grow up, isn't it Marilla?"...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Every edition of this book is truly beautiful.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    I didn't think I'd like this book at first, but it turned out to be amazing! Anne herself is a lovable character and her antics and adventures are at times funny, at times sad and at times exciting. The Canadian landscapes were vibrantly described and the vocabulary was wonderful. Anyone who hasn't read this book should definitely do so.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Helene Jeppesen

    This was my first time reading "Anne of Green Gables" and I thoroughly enjoyed it. This is a children's book, and so I was expecting a story with a lovely protagonist and some lovely and educating morals, and that's what I got. Anne is simply lovable from the very beginning where she's being fetched by Matthew on the train station to come live in Green Gables. She's highly enthousiastic about everything from the trees to the birds and the brook, and sometimes she was a bit too enthousiastic for This was my first time reading "Anne of Green Gables" and I thoroughly enjoyed it. This is a children's book, and so I was expecting a story with a lovely protagonist and some lovely and educating morals, and that's what I got. Anne is simply lovable from the very beginning where she's being fetched by Matthew on the train station to come live in Green Gables. She's highly enthousiastic about everything from the trees to the birds and the brook, and sometimes she was a bit too enthousiastic for my taste. Still, I loved her, because she was such a fierce and courageous little red-head at her age. I think that one thing about this book that appeals to children a lot is the fact that Anne has a vivid imagination. She can go on for pages about her thoughts and feelings while we, the readers, are waiting for the story to continue. I found those digressions very endearing, and they are definitely the reason why this children's book is actually over 400 pages long. The book turned into a narrative on Anne growing up, and each chapter became about a new episode in her life. That narrative style did become a bit too predictable for my taste, but in the end I still really liked this story because it warmed my heart and put a smile to my face.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Yup! Just as good as the last two times! <3

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    "I don't believe I'd really want to be a sensible person, because they are so unromantic." A series of letters. Dear Jo (aged 11), Get off The Sims and pick up a copy of Anne of Green Gables and read it now. It will change your life. Best wishes, Jo (aged 22) Dear Ms Montgomery, I would like to take your beautiful prose and drape it over the washing line in my back garden to create a mystical den that only I and my friends may enter. Who would I have to talk to for this to happen? Thank you in adva "I don't believe I'd really want to be a sensible person, because they are so unromantic." A series of letters. Dear Jo (aged 11), Get off The Sims and pick up a copy of Anne of Green Gables and read it now. It will change your life. Best wishes, Jo (aged 22) Dear Ms Montgomery, I would like to take your beautiful prose and drape it over the washing line in my back garden to create a mystical den that only I and my friends may enter. Who would I have to talk to for this to happen? Thank you in advance, J.W Dear Anne, I now understand completely why so many young girls (and some not so young girls!) have fallen in love with you over the years. You are simply marvellous and, even though I’m late to the party, you are making me feel like the guest of honour. I wish I had met you when I was younger so you could have taught me that it was OK to get lost in daydreams and not feel shy about looking at things a bit differently than other people. Because you and I and the rest of our kindred spirits really do have the best view. Lots of love, Jo. Gilbert- Just wanted to take this opportunity to introduce myself. I have a feeling that we’re going to get on splendidly in the future. Oh and I’d never crush your candied heart under my foot, though I’d probably just eat it. - J Dear Manchester, It has come to my attention that there are places in this world that are not rife with gangs of delinquents in hoodies, canals brimming with shopping trollies and boys who think it’s acceptable to wear jeggings. There is a place in this world where a “myriad of bees” hums over orchards with “a bridal flush of pinky-white bloom” and where brooks are heard laughing under the ice. You will not find sullen commuters who think it’s courteous to steal the last Metro in the morning. This is a place where you can drift “luxuriously out on a sea of daydreams” and eat plum pudding instead of a Greggs pasty and where “days slip[ped] by like golden beads on the necklace of the year.” This place has scope for imagination. (And it also has seasons other than ‘Grim’) And this place is called Prince Edward’s Island. Consider this your first warning, Manchester. If you don’t buck up your ideas, you will find yourself less one Mancunian. Yours Faithfully, J. Williams. Dear Boys who worked in the cocktail bar at Bangor SU about a year and a half ago, Remember my 21st birthday? That wasn’t raspberry cordial …. Was it? - A former student who would like to remain anonymous.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erin ☕ *Proud Book Hoarder*

    “It's been my experience that you can nearly always enjoy things if you make up your mind firmly that you will.” I finally finished this book. It's easy to get into but not one to fly through, plus I've been in a reading slump this month. Anne is a funny child - she's positive and hopeful and...talkative. It's impossible not to like her. As an adult reading this I understand Marilla because the child definitely was willful and up to getting into accidental mischief, although the beginning where t “It's been my experience that you can nearly always enjoy things if you make up your mind firmly that you will.” I finally finished this book. It's easy to get into but not one to fly through, plus I've been in a reading slump this month. Anne is a funny child - she's positive and hopeful and...talkative. It's impossible not to like her. As an adult reading this I understand Marilla because the child definitely was willful and up to getting into accidental mischief, although the beginning where they didn't want her because she was a 'useful boy' was just a shame of the times. I'm glad she was around to bring so much joy around to Avonlea, Marilla, Matthew and neighbors. When she amused them with her stories, she amused me at the same time. Each chapter is divided into an incident or event, which worked well for this type of the story. Montgomery's writing style is a delight, especially considering how old the book is. I can see why this classic has lasted through the ages. Through the afterword I found out how much it meant in particular countries for their hope after the war. Inspiring stuff. I can see why readers fall in love with Gilbert - I did myself (Carrots! Carrots!) This book works so well because it takes an unconventional girl filled with hope and wonder in the world, a girl who loves Octobers, nature, beauty, kindred spirits and friends. One loyal and ambitious and full of daydreams. I think this calls to something in all of us, a type of hopeful wonder that the world is always beautiful despite whatever wrenches are thrown in the way. This isn't the say Anne doesn't have a funny, frightful temper or that she doesn't hit with woes when warranted - actually she feels the intensity of lows as much as highs, making her a dramatic sort. This only makes her more endearing. I think the best part was the feelings she invoked in the practical and still Marilla and the shy and simple Matthew. A beautiful bonding of family tale. I haven't seen any movie or show adaptations of this one yet, but I somehow think the real beauty of the book can only come to life as its fullest in the written form.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hailey (HaileyinBookland)

    "I don't know what lies around the bend, but I'm going to believe that the best does." I cried, I laughed, and I fell in love. I grew up watching these movies because my mom just absolutely loves them but I've never really been that interested in reading the book. I knew I'd read it someday but it wasn't a top priority at all. I had to read this for my can lit course this semester and boy am I ever glad for that. I absolutely adored this story. Anne is such a darling and she just makes me look at "I don't know what lies around the bend, but I'm going to believe that the best does." I cried, I laughed, and I fell in love. I grew up watching these movies because my mom just absolutely loves them but I've never really been that interested in reading the book. I knew I'd read it someday but it wasn't a top priority at all. I had to read this for my can lit course this semester and boy am I ever glad for that. I absolutely adored this story. Anne is such a darling and she just makes me look at the world differently and want to use my imagination more, she makes me feel like a kid again. I loved all the characters and the writing was fantastic. The ending just made me want to read the rest of the series! LOVED IT!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    "Well now, she's a real interesting little thing," persisted Matthew. Truer words were never spoken when the whirlwind known as Anne Shirley comes to live with siblings Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert at Green Gables. In one terrific example of cosmic trickery, the Cuthberts, who were hoping to adopt a boy to help out around the farm, are sent instead a garrulous and imaginative, red-headed girl. Matthew takes to her immediately. Marilla needs some convincing. "Matthew Cuthbert, you don't mean to say "Well now, she's a real interesting little thing," persisted Matthew. Truer words were never spoken when the whirlwind known as Anne Shirley comes to live with siblings Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert at Green Gables. In one terrific example of cosmic trickery, the Cuthberts, who were hoping to adopt a boy to help out around the farm, are sent instead a garrulous and imaginative, red-headed girl. Matthew takes to her immediately. Marilla needs some convincing. "Matthew Cuthbert, you don't mean to say you think we ought to keep her!" Marilla's astonishment could not have been greater if Matthew had expressed a predilection for standing on his head. "Well now, no, I suppose not -- not exactly," stammered Matthew, uncomfortably driven into a corner for his precise meaning. "I suppose -- we could hardly be expected to keep her." "I should say not. What good would she be to us?" "We might be some good to her," said Matthew suddenly and unexpectedly. Poor Anne, who has spent her brief life in foster homes caring for the children of drunkards, or penned up in an orphan's asylum, is devastated. "You don't want me!" she cried. "You don't want me because I'm not a boy!" But, of course she gets to stay, and as Matthew predicts, they are indeed good for her. The surprising thing is how good she is for them. Anne's unbounded enthusiasm for the world around her is infectious, and before long, Marilla finds herself reminded of the young girl she once was. "All sorts of mornings are interesting, don't you think? You don't know what's going to happen through the day, and there's so much scope for imagination." Imagine Anne's delight at seeing Prince Edward Island for the first time. If you ever need a reminder of how amazing the world can be, look no further than Montgomery and her plucky, indomitable heroine. Green Gables This book is my comfort food - my grilled cheese with tomato soup, my hot chocolate on a cold winter's day, my cupcakes with sugary frosting. "Dear old world," she murmured, "you are very lovely, and I am glad to be alive in you."

  28. 5 out of 5

    Duane

    When I read Anne of Green Gables I was admitted into the world of orphan Anne Shirley and her life in Prince Edward Island, Canada. I fell in love with her and her adoptive parents, brother and sister Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert. Mrs. Rachel Lynde, her meddling neighbor, and Gilbert Blythe, who would become Anne's lifelong love, were also introduced early in this book, the first of eight novels telling the life story of Anne Shirley. I've read every one and it remains one of my favorite series. When I read Anne of Green Gables I was admitted into the world of orphan Anne Shirley and her life in Prince Edward Island, Canada. I fell in love with her and her adoptive parents, brother and sister Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert. Mrs. Rachel Lynde, her meddling neighbor, and Gilbert Blythe, who would become Anne's lifelong love, were also introduced early in this book, the first of eight novels telling the life story of Anne Shirley. I've read every one and it remains one of my favorite series. 5 shining stars.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katie Ziegler (Life Between Words)

    The audiobook performed by Rachel McAdams is perfection. As is the story, of course. Anne will always, always be one of my favorite stories and favorite heroines of all time. Her spunk, her kindness, her imagination, her devotion, her passion - I love her and I love all of Avonlea. ____________ Reread 8/27/18 Obviously Anne is my favorite forever. Reread for #nothankswerebookedwithanne

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Heartwarming tale I missed from the gender tracking in the readings of youth. The red-headed orphan girl of 11 adopted by the middle-aged Cuthberts was quite the force of nature. Her power of imagination, romance, and language helped to melt their frozen hearts and properness of their childless, Calvinist household. She was not the farmworker they expected when they applied to the orphanage for a boy, but she brought them many gifts, such as the ability to laugh, appreciate play, and hope for th Heartwarming tale I missed from the gender tracking in the readings of youth. The red-headed orphan girl of 11 adopted by the middle-aged Cuthberts was quite the force of nature. Her power of imagination, romance, and language helped to melt their frozen hearts and properness of their childless, Calvinist household. She was not the farmworker they expected when they applied to the orphanage for a boy, but she brought them many gifts, such as the ability to laugh, appreciate play, and hope for the future. Some of the comic scenes were priceless for me, such as when she tried to dye away her red hair to solve the problem of teasing from her peers and ended up with green hair. Or when she accidentally served her new bosom friend Diana wine by mistake and got her drunk. We experience her dealing with many common moral issues of growing up, such as bullying, cliques, and unseemly emotions of jealousy, pride, and vindictiveness. Her stubborn grudge against Gilbert for making fun of her red hair lasts many years, despite his admiration and sincere apologies. Only when illness in the family makes her seek a teaching position in the village and Gilbert makes a sacrifice to allow that to happen does she come to realize her cruel mistake. It doesn’t take much imagination to suspect a romance for them in successor volumes of the original book. Living up near the Canadian Maritimes in Maine, I have had tours of New Brunswick, Quebec, and Nova Scotia but have not had the pleasure of Prince Edward Island. Here I got a nice sense of rural life there at the turn of the 20th century and delights of the island geography, which helped keep modernism at bay for awhile. My one regret with the read is little sense of Anne’s involvement with the hard work of running a farm. Despite certain tomboy ways, she seems to have been tracked into traditional girly ways of cooking, sewing, etc. Literature was her escape into imagination and the life of the mind, and her use of that pathway to become a teacher and nascent writer makes for her a wholesome model for young girls to this day.

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