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Mystery of the Tolling Bell

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While vacationing in a seaside town, Nancy learns her father has been kidnapped. She and Ned rescue Carson Drew and help him investigate a cosmetic company’s suspicious operations. Meanwhile, the girl sleuth is captivated by another mystery. Stories about the eerie moans from a cave carved in the jagged wall of the bluff compel her to explore. Several frightened townspeopl While vacationing in a seaside town, Nancy learns her father has been kidnapped. She and Ned rescue Carson Drew and help him investigate a cosmetic company’s suspicious operations. Meanwhile, the girl sleuth is captivated by another mystery. Stories about the eerie moans from a cave carved in the jagged wall of the bluff compel her to explore. Several frightened townspeople claim to have seen a ghost, accompanied by the mournful sound of a tolling bell just before water rushes from the cave. During her searches, Nancy discovers the true cause and reasons behind these mysterious occurrences! This book is the revised text. The plot of the original story (©1946) is similar with minor revisions.


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While vacationing in a seaside town, Nancy learns her father has been kidnapped. She and Ned rescue Carson Drew and help him investigate a cosmetic company’s suspicious operations. Meanwhile, the girl sleuth is captivated by another mystery. Stories about the eerie moans from a cave carved in the jagged wall of the bluff compel her to explore. Several frightened townspeopl While vacationing in a seaside town, Nancy learns her father has been kidnapped. She and Ned rescue Carson Drew and help him investigate a cosmetic company’s suspicious operations. Meanwhile, the girl sleuth is captivated by another mystery. Stories about the eerie moans from a cave carved in the jagged wall of the bluff compel her to explore. Several frightened townspeople claim to have seen a ghost, accompanied by the mournful sound of a tolling bell just before water rushes from the cave. During her searches, Nancy discovers the true cause and reasons behind these mysterious occurrences! This book is the revised text. The plot of the original story (©1946) is similar with minor revisions.

30 review for Mystery of the Tolling Bell

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    This in the original text might be a favorite. I was appropriately worried at the stressful parts, intrigued with the colloquialisms of when it was written, interested in the dynamics between each of the characters, and always thrilled when Nancy solves the mystery and saves the day.. and in this case a Paul Revere bell too. I especially found this one interesting when Ned scolds Nancy for her thoughtlessness. He calls her out on reckless behavior that would have gotten her killed had it not b This in the original text might be a favorite. I was appropriately worried at the stressful parts, intrigued with the colloquialisms of when it was written, interested in the dynamics between each of the characters, and always thrilled when Nancy solves the mystery and saves the day.. and in this case a Paul Revere bell too. I especially found this one interesting when Ned scolds Nancy for her thoughtlessness. He calls her out on reckless behavior that would have gotten her killed had it not been for George. She listens too. It's a great mystery but there seem to be undercurrents in the relationships between Nancy and her father, Nancy and Ned, and Nancy and her friends-Bess/George. I completed missed this in the revised text and was also too young to catch all of it as well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Unlike some Nancy Drew adventures where the title has almost nothing to do with the plot, this one absolutely keeps its promise. You want to learn about bells? Well, settle in, because it's a wild life for bell enthusiasts. Immerse yourself in the pages and catch the bell bug! Nancy and her pals travel to a resort town and encounter a man who admits, "I'm a stranger to this town myself. Came here looking for a bell . . . Not an ordinary bell . . . A Paul Revere bell. . . . Old bells are valuable Unlike some Nancy Drew adventures where the title has almost nothing to do with the plot, this one absolutely keeps its promise. You want to learn about bells? Well, settle in, because it's a wild life for bell enthusiasts. Immerse yourself in the pages and catch the bell bug! Nancy and her pals travel to a resort town and encounter a man who admits, "I'm a stranger to this town myself. Came here looking for a bell . . . Not an ordinary bell . . . A Paul Revere bell. . . . Old bells are valuable as antiques." And later, when the girls take a boat trip around the rocky shore, they almost lose their lives after hearing a mysterious "warning bell." While walking in town, they hear a "tinkle of a little bell," attached to the cart of a mysterious, shifty seller of counterfeit cosmetics. Regarding bells, Nancy's new bell expert friend explains, "No two ring alike. Some are high-pitched, some low, some have beautiful tone quality, and others are so harsh they insult your ears. Bells are with us from the cradle to the grave; they rejoice in our victories and toll our sorrows. . . ." He then goes on to ask, "Know how to make a big bell? . . . First you make a mold, and that takes a good many weeks if the bell is to be a perfect one. Then you pour in the hot, liquid metal. You have to be very careful . . . " Bells, bells, blah blah . . . "The first bell foundry in this country was established by the Hanks family, ancestors of Abraham Lincoln on his mother's side . . . " See what I mean. Nonstop bells. Do not dare try a drinking game with this book! Take a drink every time a bell is mentioned, you might die. Bonus non-bell related tidbits I enjoyed: A yummy "tearoom" is the setting for some of the plot here. It's a kind of place that I would go to everyday, if it existed. Nancy, while attempting to solve her latest case, also takes a part-time job, unpaid, at this "luncheon" place, looking for clues and talking to the bell man. The shop is called Salsandee. Sal = salad. Sand = sandwich. Dee = dandee! But do not ask for salsa. That would be gauche. Nancy's personality is unusually snarky in this book. Maybe it's because she gets gassed by some sort of drug and has a dream about elves? She does. It's weird. And she loses patience with her friends at least once. "What's the matter with A.H?" George cried furiously. "He can't go off and leave us stranded here!" "Maybe he can't, but that's exactly what he's doing!" Nancy replied, as you can obviously see, you utter moron, is conveyed by her tone. No, Nancy would never call names, but it seems like she often wants to behave badly in this book, which is really something to behold!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mainon

    Reread for the 2017 Nancy Drew Sleuths convention in Ogunquit, Maine. So fun! My favorite part: semi-conscious Nancy dreams she's carried around by little brown elves. Though the dastardly cosmetics-cart salesperson is pretty funny too. Comparing the original and revised texts side by side: so much wonderful description is lost in the latter! Definitely recommend OT.

  4. 4 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    Great Nancy Drew book, as Nancy tries to discover what may or may not have happened to her father.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Cannon

    My girlfriend and I had a dose of nostalgia, and we decided to read some Nancy Drew novels. While I read a modest 5 Nancy Drew books as a child, my partner read as many as she could get her hands on, so this reading project has been interesting for the both of us. I come to the page with virgin eyes while she re-visits the tales that carried her through childhood with the seasoned lens of adulthood. In other words, a lot of "wtf really?" has been going on. As far as THE MYSTERY OF THE TOLLING BEL My girlfriend and I had a dose of nostalgia, and we decided to read some Nancy Drew novels. While I read a modest 5 Nancy Drew books as a child, my partner read as many as she could get her hands on, so this reading project has been interesting for the both of us. I come to the page with virgin eyes while she re-visits the tales that carried her through childhood with the seasoned lens of adulthood. In other words, a lot of "wtf really?" has been going on. As far as THE MYSTERY OF THE TOLLING BELL's plot, Mrs. Chantrey, formerly a woman of beachside leisure, pours a sizeable chunk of her savings into a very bad investment, forcing her to open a tea-and-sandwhich shop in order to get by. She contacts Nancy's father, Mr. Drew, to see if she has any legal options to get her money back. Mr. Drew recruits our detective Nancy, her prim friend Bess, and her tomboy friend George to help cheer Mrs. Chantrey up, enticing them into a vacation by the seaside rife with a mysterious cave, ghost, and bell-ringing. Reading this novel, I can see why children like Nancy Drew. The language is fairy tale simple and matter of fact. Lots of telling rather than showing, as writers say. The cast of characters is wide enough that everyone has someone to identify with, though Nancy is the true, fleshed out star. As promised, the mystery is a good one, taking lots of twists and turns. The perpetrators are obvious, so the book spends most of its time expanding on their dastardly scheme. There's lots of White People Get Upset That They Bought A Stupid Thing, which is fine stakes for a children's book. While a child me would have swallowed this tale hook, line, and sinker, adult me was puzzled on several fronts. While Nancy Drew basically exists outside of time, I was given to understand that these books had been updated to modern sensibilities of treating all people like human beings. It could have been worse, I suppose, but the narrator did their job of narrating with a huge helping of xenophobia (lots of mistrust of foreigners), racism (the entire cast is WASP; the criminals use brownface to appear "exotic"), and misogyny (apparently only sex workers wear make up in the Drew universe). There was also some extremely tone deaf "ah, yes, let's go off to a remote location with a strange old man," AND THEN "he left us stranded in the remote location but we'll forgive him and keep acting like he's a good guy." Which is No. That would not happen in any decade. I also wanted the narrator to dwell more on certain points. Ned Nickerson acts as the Muscle, which had me giggling and tender-hearted. Over the course of the story, a few dances happened, but all together they perhaps lasted 5 sentences. I realize, like, kids read this, but no hand holding? No looking into each other's eyes? No fuzzy, happy feelings in their hearts? Is Ned only there to be the Muscle and convince everyone that Nancy is straight? Conversely, there are points where Nancy is "deeply frightened" and yet acts not at all like a frightened person, what with all her limbs still working and her brain being still full of common sense. What kept the book at 3 stars was the good mystery, the avoidance of YA cliche, and the tiny bits of queer subtext I picked up. Mrs. Chantrey, a widow, lives with fellow widow June Barber. The narrator embraces George with her tomboyish ways, letting her wear masculine clothes, punch criminals, and do some hard thinking without condemnation. As a parent, Mr. Drew is an asset to the investigation and respectful of his daughter instead of totally oblivious and useless. Nancy is the epitome of level-headed self-sufficiency, but doesn't shy away from calling on friends to help. She is allowed to be weak and strong, a full human being. These elements saved the novel and encouraged me to pick up one or two more of the series. Buckle up, folks.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    nancy drew and ned nickerson are wlw/mlm solidarity at its finest.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    (3.6/5): One of the villains is named "Grumper" and Carson Drew is incapacitated by Ambien for 80% of the book

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tabi34

    Well, I finished the first 23 books in the series. I'm beginning to find Nancy annoying. She is uber-focused to the extent that she only hangs out with her friends when they can help her solve a mystery. She uses Ned when she needs some muscle. At the end of this book, Ned even makes a comment that he's getting tired of her constant pre-occupation with her sleuthing when they are together. If she doesn't want to have a relationship with the boy - cut him loose already. Times are very different t Well, I finished the first 23 books in the series. I'm beginning to find Nancy annoying. She is uber-focused to the extent that she only hangs out with her friends when they can help her solve a mystery. She uses Ned when she needs some muscle. At the end of this book, Ned even makes a comment that he's getting tired of her constant pre-occupation with her sleuthing when they are together. If she doesn't want to have a relationship with the boy - cut him loose already. Times are very different these days with young adult fiction. By now, since they are 18 they would probably have been sleeping together since book 6 at the latest. These books also make no reference to world events nor do they effect Nancy and her world; granted they have been updated, but still there is no mention of wars, depressions, drugs - anything that would've made this book more realistic at the time they were written. Instead, Nancy and friends are oblivious to anything that is remotely worldly. Nancy is often kidnapped, or man-handled - but she outwits her captives. Today, Nancy would've been raped, assaulted, drugged and tortured. I can't believe that young women, who were the target audience for these books were so naive that they didn't know what could really happen to a young woman alone in the situations Nancy found herself in. Plus, criminals aren't always dumb and definitely a young, naive 18 year old woman is going to outwit two or more captors. These books are a good look back through rose colored glasses to see what we hoped times looked like. We can see what was important and what virtues we wished for our daughters. I think I'll go read a good Ann Rule true-crime book to give myself some equilibrium.

  9. 5 out of 5

    thewestchestarian

    But, wait, what was Tyrox doing that was specifically illegal? In this lesser of the Nancy Drew books, Nancy busts Harry Tyrox for creating knock-offs of expensive perfumes at discount prices. Nancy, the insufferable Ned and her gang frown at such near-do-wellery. Shame! Of course, this activity is not specifically illegal. Entire automobile manufactures (Hyundai) exist well within the law for much the same purpose and every supermarket and drugstore happily and legally display cheap knockoffs o But, wait, what was Tyrox doing that was specifically illegal? In this lesser of the Nancy Drew books, Nancy busts Harry Tyrox for creating knock-offs of expensive perfumes at discount prices. Nancy, the insufferable Ned and her gang frown at such near-do-wellery. Shame! Of course, this activity is not specifically illegal. Entire automobile manufactures (Hyundai) exist well within the law for much the same purpose and every supermarket and drugstore happily and legally display cheap knockoffs of branded items right on the same shelf as their progenitors. So why does Tyrox go the trouble of knocking people out (and, boy, an anesthetizing perfume would be impossible to keep on the shelves if Mon Coer just produced that instead) and kidnapping them to avoid their revealing of his scheme which is neither nefarious or even particularly immoral? Carolyn Keene, or at least the folks who ghost wrote her, have shown Occupy Wall Street tendencies in the past and one can infer that "The Tolling Bell" mystery has a tinge of anti-capitalism to it. That and the central conceit that a bell gets stuck in an aperture in an old pirate cave that widens until it tolls (instead of just rattles around when the water hits it) doesn't quite live up to being the big reveal after 300 pages of Keene's pedestrian writing. In short, if you are not doing the full Nancy Drew tour you can skip this one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    What can I say? Every once in a while a girl needs her Nancy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Phyllis

    This is neck and neck with THE SECRET OF RED GATE FARM for the best classic Nancy Drew book. Really bizarre imagery and much more interesting than you would expect a book about bell collectors to be. Plus at one point Nancy gets all messed up from chloroform or something and has a weird waking dream that she is surrounded by a group of squabbling gnomes. One of those amazing WHAT!!!! moments in the Nancy Drew Mystery Stories.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Santomartino

    A New Twist This book was a bit different than others in the series to date. The setting was interesting and Nancy's compassion for the problems of other comes shining through again with equal measures of mystery, action, and adventure coming in. Fans of the series will find this an entertaining story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Darinda

    Nancy's father has been kidnapped. Good thing she's a great amateur sleuth and can solve any mystery thrown her way. Fast and entertaining read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Even though these books are written for pre-teens, I LOVE them. I grew up on them. I'm hoping to have the whole series (yeah, right!! LOL). The book was well written and I loved the story line.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    Another great volume in this series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. What's better than a lot of Ned action? NOTHING. But a close second is NANCY GETTING DRUGGED UP AND THINKING ELVES ARE RESPONSIBLE. Nancy and the chums are off to Candleton. Nancy's dad is working on a swindling case, and his good buddy (whose name I can't remember) was totes ripped off by an asshole selling worthless stock. When Nancy gets there, her dad is nowhere to be found, even though he should have been there, and so Nancy freaks out. But! Mystery alert. A nearby cave is haunted by a ghostl What's better than a lot of Ned action? NOTHING. But a close second is NANCY GETTING DRUGGED UP AND THINKING ELVES ARE RESPONSIBLE. Nancy and the chums are off to Candleton. Nancy's dad is working on a swindling case, and his good buddy (whose name I can't remember) was totes ripped off by an asshole selling worthless stock. When Nancy gets there, her dad is nowhere to be found, even though he should have been there, and so Nancy freaks out. But! Mystery alert. A nearby cave is haunted by a ghostly figure who warns people off by ringing a tolling bell (title alert!) and then sending a big ol' wave of water through! The Notorious NBG investigate and almost drown, and then Nancy climbs up on a cliff, and... like, swoons. And has this dreamy impression that some elves picked her up and walked off with her. 'Cause she's drugged. Secondary mystery alert! A hella suspicious "French" lady is selling Mon Coeur cosmetics. Bess buys some, because Bess is the dupe of the group, but they ain't great cosmetics/perfumes. Also NED'S STAYING NEARBY, NO BIG. It is the flimsiest explanation ever and I love it. Nancy and Ned go on several dates, including but not limited to dinner and dancing, a "long drive in the country" (this is 1946, so crazy reunion sex because he's finally back from the war????), and clue-finding. Nancy receives a call that her father's at a super sketch motel a few towns over and I love her pure disgust when walking into it and thinking, "Dad would NEVER stay at such a cheap place." But he is there! After a bunch of shenanigans, Nancy and Ned finally get Carson out of there so he can get better. There's a lot of Ned pacing with nervousness when he can't find Nancy and threatening to punch anyone who prevents him from getting to his Lady Love. It's nice. So, Carson's case involves the sale of Mon Coeur stock, so their mysteries overlap. A guy comes up to the house and says that her father's somewhere and needs her, and Nancy's like "NOPE BITCH NOT FALLING FOR THAT" and he's immediately like "KEEP YOUR NOSE OUT OF OUR BUSINESS LITTLE GIRL" and he drives off but drops a clue. Then Ned comes by and Nancy leaves a note for her friends saying that she's off with Ned, and the chums come home at 2am and find the note and Nancy's not home yet and Bess is like "I wonder if they eloped?" and I'm like YES PLEASE YES MORE OF THIS YES. So Nancy and Ned's car is stranded during a bad storm thanks to a hit and run, and I'm like YES HOW ABOUT ROMANTIC CAR SEX WITH THE RAIN PROVIDING A ROMANTIC BACKDROP but NO, they get a ride back. Because damn it. I can't win. Then Nancy and Ned go investigate the Cave of Romantic Fainting and Nancy half-faints and Ned's like "I got this" and fuckin' bridal-carries her back to the car, and I'm like BEST NANCY/NED SCENE EVER, OR BEST SCENE IN ALL OF FICTION? Anyway. At the end of it, one of the kidnapping elves strands Nancy and a secondary guest star in the cave, which is about to flood, and is like "WE WILL ALL DIE HERE, AHAHAHAHA" and I'm like "shit just got real!" And then NED COMES IN WEARING A GAS MASK AND SAVES THEM. (Did I mention that the kidnapping elf also makes fainting gas? Anyway, yeah.) He even saves the little dork who was about to just take all y'all down with him. So at the end of it, some of the money is recovered for the swindled people and the bad guys are caught, and Ned's like "girl you are a little pirate 'cause you stole mon coeur" and I'm like PLEASE GET MARRIED GUYS, MY HEART CANNOT DEAL WITH ALL THIS JOY. Anyway they're all flirty and it's adorable and also Nancy probably has the Paul Revere bell that was hanging in the cave as a souvenir, after all this. I mean, of course.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Stven

    I was a voracious reader as a kid and, along with all the Hardy Boys mysteries I could lay my hands on, made a big dent in the Nancy Drew series as well. What prompted my reading another one even though I am well beyond the age of the intended audience was Melanie Rehak's history of how they came to be conceived and published, Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her, in which she confided that her favorite, read over and over, was Mystery of the Tolling Bell. The prose is so primiti I was a voracious reader as a kid and, along with all the Hardy Boys mysteries I could lay my hands on, made a big dent in the Nancy Drew series as well. What prompted my reading another one even though I am well beyond the age of the intended audience was Melanie Rehak's history of how they came to be conceived and published, Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her, in which she confided that her favorite, read over and over, was Mystery of the Tolling Bell. The prose is so primitive that it's clunky, but the story keeps moving and keeps the pages turning. The intrepid Nancy Drew, "eighteen and attractive," is an uncomplicated character intrigued by mysteries and always ready to take action. The events are puzzling enough to merit five pages of explanation when the crook is caught and then a nice little bow is tied on the package as Nancy identifies the "tolling bell" of the title at the end. Certainly the story is written to formula, but it's not a bad formula, and I don't see anything wrong with a young reader aspiring to be as smart and efficacious as Nancy Drew.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    I am absolutely convinced that the version I read was the original 1946 text. For one thing, the pages were not just yellow from age, they were almost sepia-brown. The binding was literally "falling apart at the seams," and I was grateful (actually, amazed!) to find that no pages were missing. Also, Nancy is described as having golden hair, unlike most of the later rewritten volumes, which portray her as having titian hair. As for the mystery itself -- it's typical Nancy Drew, with at least three I am absolutely convinced that the version I read was the original 1946 text. For one thing, the pages were not just yellow from age, they were almost sepia-brown. The binding was literally "falling apart at the seams," and I was grateful (actually, amazed!) to find that no pages were missing. Also, Nancy is described as having golden hair, unlike most of the later rewritten volumes, which portray her as having titian hair. As for the mystery itself -- it's typical Nancy Drew, with at least three interrelated storylines, all resolved in the last couple of chapters. Nancy is reckless, getting herself and her friends into unnecessarily dangerous situations -- but she wouldn't be Nancy if she weren't impetuous. Her boyfriend Ned Nickerson is more prominent in this tale; I don't remember how his presence in Candleton was explained, since none of the action takes place in their River Heights hometown. Nancy's father, lawyer Carson Drew, is prominent in the early chapters; the housekeeper, Hannah Gruen, only "appears" as a voice on the telephone. Gal pals Bess and George accompany Nancy on this adventure.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Once I start, I just can’t stop! 3rd Nancy Drew mystery in 3 days. This is one that starts off weird for me. Can’t give a definitive answer as to why, but it does. Anyway, once I inevitably got sucked in, I forgot what bothered me about the intro. This one is even more harrowing than the last! There was an actual mention of a death by drowning, fumes that made one fall asleep almost instantly, sea caves, abandoned houses with secret passageways, a ponzi type scheme going in with the locals.. Dis Once I start, I just can’t stop! 3rd Nancy Drew mystery in 3 days. This is one that starts off weird for me. Can’t give a definitive answer as to why, but it does. Anyway, once I inevitably got sucked in, I forgot what bothered me about the intro. This one is even more harrowing than the last! There was an actual mention of a death by drowning, fumes that made one fall asleep almost instantly, sea caves, abandoned houses with secret passageways, a ponzi type scheme going in with the locals.. Disguises, aliases, bells made by Paul Revere, and, to top it all off, a crazed deformed man whose willing to kill himself and his enemies so they won’t take his bell from him. I mean.... what more could you want?? I give it 3 stars because of the slow beginning, and it was a little more “romance” driven I felt, and that took away from the story. Love me some Ned Nickerson, but it detracted the story a bit for me this time.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    In many of the mysteries, there will be several seemingly unconnected events that eventually Nancy puts together as one nice package Mystery. Sometimes these fit seamlessly and sometimes it feels like they were forced into being connected. This mystery felt to me like the best rendition of this so far. The “random” events at the beginning did have me legitimately wondering how they could connect to the main mysteries, and then when they were brought together to form the bigger it picture it made In many of the mysteries, there will be several seemingly unconnected events that eventually Nancy puts together as one nice package Mystery. Sometimes these fit seamlessly and sometimes it feels like they were forced into being connected. This mystery felt to me like the best rendition of this so far. The “random” events at the beginning did have me legitimately wondering how they could connect to the main mysteries, and then when they were brought together to form the bigger it picture it made sense. There were definitely some iffy bits with the “elves” (one of whom went crazy at the end for no apparent reason), but other than that I enjoyed the hunt for multiple bells and bad guys, near-drownings, and even the danger that came to Carson Drew—which is a rare occurrence.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    I don't know if it was because I paced myself a bit more (I was distracted reader), or if this was legitimately better installment of this series, but I enjoyed this mystery a lot more than others. The bad guys were interesting, the mystery was more interesting-even if still a bit contrived like usual. Nancy has an uncanny ability to vacation where shenanigans are going down-but as a loyal reader, I have consistently suspended my disbelief and continue to enjoy these mysteries. I would recommend I don't know if it was because I paced myself a bit more (I was distracted reader), or if this was legitimately better installment of this series, but I enjoyed this mystery a lot more than others. The bad guys were interesting, the mystery was more interesting-even if still a bit contrived like usual. Nancy has an uncanny ability to vacation where shenanigans are going down-but as a loyal reader, I have consistently suspended my disbelief and continue to enjoy these mysteries. I would recommend this book to fans of Nancy Drew, or those interested in sampling Nancy Drew-you won't be disappointed!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    I can no longer recommend Nancy Drew mysteries in general, and this one in particular. Not only are they not politically correct, but Nancy is always investigating various criminals without any authority, weapons, communications gear, or backup except for Bess and George (and sometimes Ned). Sometimes she doesn't even have a car! In The Mystery of the Tolling Bell, Nancy comes within a hair of drowning because of her investigating, and only survives because of a deus ex machina. These days, it's I can no longer recommend Nancy Drew mysteries in general, and this one in particular. Not only are they not politically correct, but Nancy is always investigating various criminals without any authority, weapons, communications gear, or backup except for Bess and George (and sometimes Ned). Sometimes she doesn't even have a car! In The Mystery of the Tolling Bell, Nancy comes within a hair of drowning because of her investigating, and only survives because of a deus ex machina. These days, it's not a good idea to encourage amateurs to investigate criminals--they could get shot. I would pull the entire series from all classroom and school libraries.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Savannah Helmer

    The Mystery of the Toiling Bell was a very thrilling story where Nancy, Bess, George, and Ned solve a mystery in a sea side town. Filled with mysterious ghosts, kidnappings, sad bells, and bizarre dreams this is a must read of the Nancy Drew stories!!

  24. 4 out of 5

    ErikaH15

    2017 Nancy Drew Sleuths Convention theme. It was so nice to dive into this book again and basically relive my childhood! I absolutely love these books, and this was a refreshing mystery read for me!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

    Two mysteries in one! Lots of fun. Follow Nancy and her friends as she unravels them both.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ayanami Faerudo

    Notes: *Second read *A book where I could tolerate Bess *This is not a "mystery" book

  27. 4 out of 5

    IrishFan

    This mystery was not one I remembered reading. It was ok. A little far fetched that they could figure out what was in the cave and then suddenly they find the missing Paul Revere bell! an ok from me.

  28. 5 out of 5

    William Acosta

    This book was reread and it was equally fun at my 68 years than when first read I suggest to young parents with children to introduce them to this type of books to spark their reading habits

  29. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Mercado

    I love the Nancy Drew mystery series

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    very mysterious and sometimes creepy when you read it at night.

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