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Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

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A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of very curious photographs. It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off t A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of very curious photographs. It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow-impossible though it seems-they may still be alive. A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.


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A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of very curious photographs. It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off t A mysterious island. An abandoned orphanage. A strange collection of very curious photographs. It all waits to be discovered in Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, an unforgettable novel that mixes fiction and photography in a thrilling reading experience. As our story opens, a horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow-impossible though it seems-they may still be alive. A spine-tingling fantasy illustrated with haunting vintage photography, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children will delight adults, teens, and anyone who relishes an adventure in the shadows.

30 review for Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Hi! I'm tired of defending myself for what I wrote on this stupid book. So I thought I would do a favor to all you super-fans out there that want to read a negative review of their favorite book (WHY??!?), and just hide it with spoiler tags. So now, if Goodreads hasn't goofed, you can just see this review and move on. Focus on reading books that you like instead of hunting down negative reviews for your favorite book. Or writing a review why you liked this book. You know, the reason we are all o Hi! I'm tired of defending myself for what I wrote on this stupid book. So I thought I would do a favor to all you super-fans out there that want to read a negative review of their favorite book (WHY??!?), and just hide it with spoiler tags. So now, if Goodreads hasn't goofed, you can just see this review and move on. Focus on reading books that you like instead of hunting down negative reviews for your favorite book. Or writing a review why you liked this book. You know, the reason we are all on Goodreads in the first place. (view spoiler)[Who hasn't seen this creepy book, lurking proudly in the "New Releases" section? It practically SCREAMS Halloween--a nice, delightful scare that makes you lock your doors tighter, leave on the nightlight, and snuggle deeply under your covers. Only...it doesn't. Sure, the girl looks REALLY creepy on the cover and many of the back images are enough to give you the eebie jeebies, but NOTHING that remotely scary EVER occurs within these pages. Okay, maybe the very first scene, where Jacob sees the Thing for the first time, can count. But I am not the most stalwart of persons. I turn away at blood and gore in movies, my stomach churns when I read about gobbets of flesh, and I was scared of the Stay-Puff Marshmallow guy until about two years ago. So when I say that I had no troubles reading this at 11:30 at night and then going to sleep peacefully, you know this isn't that scary. And that is only one of the many failures of this potentially awesome book. This book promises to do something rarely seen in fiction: combine pictures with a story. But there it fails yet again. The pictures are awkwardly inserted into the story, usually surrounded by text along the lines of: "And X showed Y a picture of a girl PICTURE HERE". Not what I would call the most "seamless" of storytelling. And let's talk about characters, or what passes for characters in this book, starting with Jacob. I really need to get this off my back, so please excuse me here: What a selfish, whiny, obnoxious, pretentious, arrogant little @#$%wad! From the first chapter, where he is trying to get his sorry @ss fired, I hated him (oddly enough, in the Prologue, I actually liked him). We have 14 million Americans without jobs--these are men and women with families, who would take ANY job they could get their hands on just to put food on the table--and here this white, upper class, straight male joker misbehaves at work, treating his boss with disrespect, and gets away with it because his uncles own the store. (This doesn't even touch on the millions of non-Americans who are unemployed and destitute, living in squalor, starving, watching their children die, unable to move from their station because brats like Jacob are taking the jobs they could have had.) Other than he doesn't want to be in the "family business", why does he act this way? I have no clue. I would think the supposedly "smart" Jacob would realize that this behavior isn't the most mature way of handling the situation and would, I dunno, maybe talk with his parents or uncles about the job situation if he didn't like it, but apparently, Jacob is merely smart in the way that most authors make their characters smart, i.e. a sentence saying "X is smart". Jacob is hardly relatable; his parents are obscenely wealthy (how convenient), making it easy for Jacob to go to Wales. Jacob is constantly acting like a diva, complaining about all the wealth he has (must be nice), while reveling in what it can get him access to. He drops words like "Sisyphean" but never comes across like the type of kid who would do that (such as Anne Shirley). But poor Jacob, he doesn't have any friends! Well, maybe it's because his abrasive, self-righteous, privileged personality chases them away. But poor Jacob, his mommy and daddy don't listen to every word he says and believe him! Well, maybe it's because a traumatic incident happened, and they are dealing with their own grief. Or maybe it's because they are too busy at work, trying to make enough money to send our resident brat to Wales. So what could have been a strong character (like Quentin from John Green's "Paper Towns") comes off like a 5 year old who hasn't realized that the world doesn't revolve around him. Other characters are so flat, it's pathetic. The parents are cold and impersonal, all the better for Jacob to "run away" to his fantasy friends (which, by the way, I predicted would happen at about the 130 page mark). Every one of the "peculiar children" has only one note to play and has no background, nothing to make them remarkable beyond the one ability that Riggs has given them that may or may not have anything to do with the picture (such as the girl with the mouth in the back of her head--what was up with that???). They are introduced sloppily, awkwardly tying into their picture. And thinking about these "children": isn't it odd that they look and act like children? Shouldn't we see something more along the lines of Kirsten Dunst's character in the movie, "Interview with a Vampire"--an adult stuck in a child's body? In fact, why are these "children" able to experience the passage of time at all, but the town around them recreates the same day over and over again? If it was explained in the book, I didn't catch it. About the only one that does stand out is Emma, because she is Designated Love InterestTM. Which is disgusting, as 70 years ago, she was canoodling Jacob's grandfather. God, why does every young adult novel nowadays require a romance? I was really hoping with this book that we wouldn't have a romance, and based on the write-up, I assumed it would avoid this all-too-common YA trope. But no, we have to have a romantic couple in here, because we have to do something to draw in the preteen and teen Twilight crowd. I mean, it's not like there are girls out there who like Star Wars, Star Trek, Lord of the Rings, and stuff for more than just the sexy times. I guess if A) Jacob had been likeable, B) Emma had been likeable and not been his grandfather's age, and C) the romance had been well-done and not rushed I would have liked it, but alas, it was D) none of the above. And what is it with all these guys being attracted to ice cold women pointing knives into their bellies? Do I need to read more Freud or something? So for story... *bursts into gales of laughter* Oh, sorry about that. *wipes tears from eyes* Yeah, story. Well, the beginning was pretty interesting, with Jacob discovering his grandfather's past. But after finding Miss Peregrine's Home, it just disappears into Sexy Times with Teenaged Looking 80-Year Olds until the author realized he could include another plot and extend the book another 100 pages. And then, as if this book didn't p!ss me off enough, the book ends on basically a cliffhanger prepping for a sequel. A SEQUEL! This book didn't deserve a full novel, much less a SEQUEL! And let me get yet another pet peeve out of the way: World War II is the focal point of this book? Really? Jacob is 16; his grandfather was a teenager in WWII? Sure, it's possible, but come on! It's also just as likely that Jacob, 16 in 2011 (assuming that the book is set during that time because there is zero indication otherwise) could have had a grandfather born in the 40's and 50's. I mean, I'm in my 30's and my grandparents were mostly born in the 20's and 30's - one grandfather had to lie about his age to join the Navy and my grandmothers were way too young. But let's ignore this red herring (Thank you, Captain Obvious, for pointing out the math) and get to the real meat: what is our obsession with WWII? If something bad happens, drag in the Nazis? When you need a quick, easy, lazy villain, let's pull up the epitome of evil in the 20th century without a spec of in-depth study or nuance? Nazis don't have to have any character, motivation or background - nope, all Nazis are EVUL EVUL BAD BAD people, so they make PERFECT villains for lazy writers. I dare an author, particularly a young adult author, to make a character a veteran or survivor of a different war - say, Vietnam. Or maybe Bosnia or Iraq. Wait, they don't want to write about the highly controversial Vietnam War? Gulf War? No to Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghan and Iraq too? I wonder why? Oh, yes, because the moment we say that Jacob's grandfather is a survivor of Vietnam, we have to address the fact that America barged in on a war in the name of defeating communism more than helping out the people living there. For any war besides WWII, we have to address the elephant in the room: how there really AREN'T any "bad guys" and how *GASP* the US MAY actually look like evil overlords! And we canNOT have any Young Adult book DARE trample on the GREAT US of A!!! I am guessing the ONLY REASON this book is doing well is John Green's bold endorsement on the back: "A tense, moving, and wondrously strange first novel. The photographs and text work together brilliantly to create an unforgettable story." Besides the fact that for the first 50 horrible pages, in which the book tries and fails to be the next John Green novel, this book is about as far from "tense, moving, and wondrously strange" as it could get. As for the "photographs and text work[ing] together", no way, not at all. The sad thing is, the Prologue was absolutely amazing. It DID have that creepy portent that the cover promised. It DID have an interesting character--the grandfather and Jacob (who hadn't jumped head first off the Likeable Cliff yet). But all that was wasted in what seemed to be a lack of plot, a horrible protagonist (whom I wanted to smack some sense into) and trying too hard to be quirky and funny like a contemporary John Green novel. Very disappointing and not recommended. I will NOT be checking out any sequels in this series. UPDATE: Four years after reading this book and writing this review, I've had way too many comments questioning my character in regards to this stupid book. So instead of answering every comment, I'll be deleting and banning a lot of people. You're welcome. I've spent this section plus many pages of comments on this review explaining the various points of my opinion, so I would recommend reading them before pointing out something I missed. Some people have commented that's way too much time - I also think any time spent watching football (either American or otherwise) is too much, but I certainly don't tell my aunt, a big 49ers fan, that. The world is full of diverse people, with diverse opinions. I have never gone onto a positive review to argue the other person's intelligence or mental capacity in liking this stupid book, and I don't understand why it's OK to argue with my negative opinion, to come onto my review on a book and insult me. This is not two people sharing a different opinion. This is insulting a person over her own opinions she vocalized on a site dedicated to reader reviews. It is bullying, and I don't have to put up with it. A review is my opinion; an opinion can neither be right or wrong. This is my space. I am allowed to say what I want here, as long as it doesn't violate Goodreads code. You have your own space. If you want to talk about how awesome Miss Peregrine is, instead of wasting time here not changing my mind (and in fact causing me to hate this book even more than I used to dislike it), why don't you take to your space and say what you want? And if you are really worried about people reading, why don't you let potential readers look at the evidence of various reviews and choose for themselves? I prefer someone to think critically and decide whether one person's flaws are another person's flaws than to force my opinions on someone. (hide spoiler)]

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    Let me tell you a secret, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children is actually: (I don't think what follows is a spoiler, but am marking it as such anyway as some people think it is.) (view spoiler)[ for elementary school kids. Yes, the book tries to pretend it is something else, embellishing itself with creepy and weird vintage photographs but the reality is, it is nothing more than a regurgitated version of X-Men. (hide spoiler)] Rarely do I come across a book that is as far from what it aspires Let me tell you a secret, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children is actually: (I don't think what follows is a spoiler, but am marking it as such anyway as some people think it is.) (view spoiler)[ for elementary school kids. Yes, the book tries to pretend it is something else, embellishing itself with creepy and weird vintage photographs but the reality is, it is nothing more than a regurgitated version of X-Men. (hide spoiler)] Rarely do I come across a book that is as far from what it aspires to be as this one. You might expect Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children to be a mysterious, deranged, quirky, horror-filled tale, but it just isn't. The novel was clearly written around a collection of peculiar and unsettling photos, but the narrative never reaches the level of creepy of the visual materials it relies on. Instead, it is a mediocre at best book that should have had 10-year old as its characters instead of teens. And instead of artsy, angst-filled photographs, it should have had more appropriate pencil illustrations to go with its Monster-is-going-to EAT-you! BOO! plot. You don't believe me it's bad? Try reading the book or, better yet, listen to the audio version of it without the visual aid of the photos. See what you think of the writing then. The photos are worth looking at though.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rick Riordan

    This book has been getting a lot of well-deserved attention for the way it incorporates unusual antique photographs into the narrative. The premise: Jacob grew up on his grandfather’s stories about his own childhood during World War II. Supposedly his grandfather escaped the Holocaust by taking refuge on a Welsh island, at an orphanage that catered to children with strange powers. The grandfather even has photos to prove it. As Jacob grows up, he loses faith in his grandfather, and assumes the s This book has been getting a lot of well-deserved attention for the way it incorporates unusual antique photographs into the narrative. The premise: Jacob grew up on his grandfather’s stories about his own childhood during World War II. Supposedly his grandfather escaped the Holocaust by taking refuge on a Welsh island, at an orphanage that catered to children with strange powers. The grandfather even has photos to prove it. As Jacob grows up, he loses faith in his grandfather, and assumes the stories were fantasies, the photos faked. But when a horrible, inexplicable tragedy occurs, Jacob has to reevaluate. Could those stories have been real? Could this island refuge still exist so many years later? And is it possible his grandfather’s paranoia about ‘monsters’ wasn’t just paranoia? Even without the photos, this would be a gripping story, but the photos add an irresistible element of mystery. The first-person narration is authentic, funny, and poignant. I’m looking forward to the next volume in the series!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zoë

    Edit on January 9th, 2016: I haven't thought about this book since I read it in July and I really have no interest anymore in reading the rest of the series. ---------- It definitely was a slow moving book, but the plot really held my attention and I loved the use of the pictures. Sometimes I felt like he tried a little too hard to make the pictures perfectly fit into the story which made it a little awkward to read, but they still made the reading experience more interesting. The book really rea Edit on January 9th, 2016: I haven't thought about this book since I read it in July and I really have no interest anymore in reading the rest of the series. ---------- It definitely was a slow moving book, but the plot really held my attention and I loved the use of the pictures. Sometimes I felt like he tried a little too hard to make the pictures perfectly fit into the story which made it a little awkward to read, but they still made the reading experience more interesting. The book really read like a movie and I can't wait to see how Tim Burton's interpretation is going to turn out!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Christine Riccio

    Really enjoyed this!! Here's my booktalk! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9IEq... Can't wait to read Hollow City =D

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily May

    When I was a child, one of my favourite things to do was to look through pictures in books - children's picture books, colouring books, etc. - and tell stories in my mind with them. For example, a picture of two children holding hands would start this story of friendship, which would then grow with every picture, introducing grander stories and dragons, unicorns, whatever the pictures gave me. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children reminds me of that. This story, for me, feels completely disj When I was a child, one of my favourite things to do was to look through pictures in books - children's picture books, colouring books, etc. - and tell stories in my mind with them. For example, a picture of two children holding hands would start this story of friendship, which would then grow with every picture, introducing grander stories and dragons, unicorns, whatever the pictures gave me. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children reminds me of that. This story, for me, feels completely disjointed and messy. It is evidently framed around this marvelous collection of creepy, vintage photographs, but the story is not smoothly incorporated. It reads like you can imagine the author viewing each image and trying to find a way to fit it into the plot of the book. Here's a weird image of a girl smoking a pipe and peeling potatoes, how can I make that part of the story? Here's a creepy picture of some twins in clown outfits, how do I add that to the book? And if you're thinking of reading this as a creepy book for Halloween - it is not scary at all. The narrative never delivers an atmosphere deserving of the photography. It's all a bit bland and never becomes anything more than a standard paranormal tale about teens/children with special powers. Additionally, the narrator - Jacob - is simply not a character I like to read about. I hate it when rich, privileged narrators constantly wallow in their own self-pity for no good reason. Here, he says: If I never went home, what exactly would I be missing? I pictured my cold cavernous house, my friendless town full of bad memories, the utterly unremarkable life that had been mapped out for me. What??? He is from a ridiculously wealthy family and has two loving parents and lives in a huge house. He did have a part time job, but he took it for granted and spent his time showing up late and deliberately shelving things wrong because he wanted to be fired. He also did have a best friend, but his friend not surprisingly walked out after this exchange: “What are you, my mom?” “Do I look like I blow truckers for food stamps?” I did not like him at all. Some unlikable characters are unlikable in a complex and interesting way, but Jacob is just a spoiled, entitled and selfish brat. Add that to the simplistic, yet messy, storytelling and this book was completely disappointing. I'm also tempted to say it "reads like a middle grade" book, but that would be an insult to some of the fantastic middle grade books I've read recently. It just reads like a not very good book. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube | Store

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wigs

    I can't even. The poor execution of a good idea is just so upsetting to me. The main problem with this book is that the entire time I was reading I felt like a high school English teacher grading a student's paper, when in fact I am not a teacher or anyone who majored in English or writing. If I am simply a normal reader thinking this, then who the hell was working as the editor?? Did they not bring up these issues? Clearly the several people the author listed in his acknowledgements couldn't have I can't even. The poor execution of a good idea is just so upsetting to me. The main problem with this book is that the entire time I was reading I felt like a high school English teacher grading a student's paper, when in fact I am not a teacher or anyone who majored in English or writing. If I am simply a normal reader thinking this, then who the hell was working as the editor?? Did they not bring up these issues? Clearly the several people the author listed in his acknowledgements couldn't have been reading closely enough. The text was just screaming "amateur writer, please help." What surprises me is that the author's background is in film. Being that I myself have a background in film, I can tell you that the one thing that is stressed is making conclusive ideas. Do not bring up something that has no relevance to the rest of the story (because obviously in film, every second is costly, whereas of course in Microsoft Word there is so consequence to typing more characters.) What bothered me most was that the author seemed unaware about how to properly use the gimmick of his entire book: the old photographs, some photoshopped, some vintage original, to illustrate the world. He used several of these pictures simply to use them, and I find out later that they in fact contribute nothing to the story. That's right. There's no reason at all for them to be there. Often it seems the author was thinking "oh that's a cool picture, let's throw it in," when in fact there's no connection that it's in there, besides the narrator finding the picture. Here I'm speaking of the several pictures of Peculiars that we never meet, the clown twins (who we have TWO different photographs of at different times in the book, as if they have significance), the dog headed boy, the girl in the jar, the girl with the reflection....I could go on. Why include these photographs if they are not involved in your story? You may think they look cool, author, but it weakens your story when you make no mention of them in your story after you show their pictures. At least make up some sort of subplot about how they've been disappearing or leaving, as to why you've brought up characters simply for putting in pictures. The author states at the end of the book there are only ten children, so it's not like they're there and just not talking. So if there are only ten children, then the fact that all these pictures in there of much more than ten children makes it confusing and annoying. The lack of cohesion was just destroying my brain. Another thing that weakened the picture gimmick is that the multiple pictures of Emma were clearly different people and it bothered me that the author pretended that wasn't noticeable. The first picture of Emma was more about age 10/11 looking, and the fact that her age, or a description to indicate she's more mature, isn't stated til two chapters after we see that picture completely derailed me and what the mental picture of her was supposed to be. Then the comparison of the picture of potato peeling Emma with the last picture of Emma were not possibly believable as being the same person. I may sound picky, but if your book is centered around this idea, then make your concept strong! Horace as well, the two pictures we have of Horace aren't possibly the same person, and again, an issue with using about a 9 year old kid for his first picture and then a 17 year old boy's picture for the next. Consistency is important, and if he cared I felt he would have dug deeper into finding better photos for his characters instead of just saying "oh this might work." (And I'm not sure which ones were photoshopped and which ones weren't, but the perspective of Victor's bed in the mirror of that one picture is absolutely impossible, and it bothered me to no end looking at it) Aside from the fact that the entire book felt like it was created simply to show some 'cool vintage photos,' I felt that the author didn't have a full grip on his own ideas. He had good ideas, as complicated as they are. Nice settings, I enjoyed some of the scenes, like the glowfish, and Enoch's big moment, but the writing itself was rather weak. The thing that bothered me quite a lot for the first 2/3 of the book is that the reader is too smart for the book. This book is clearly meant for older teens, due to the language I couldn't say it's for anybody younger, and I know older teens are clearly capable of putting together the information presented and figuring out what's going on. However the narrator does not, and the reader ends up waiting several more pages each time for the narrator to figure it out and then state importantly that he's figured out what's going on as if it's a revelation when we've been waiting for the obvious for a while. Luckily though, at the end there were at least some things I did not see coming, which felt a bit better. However writing-wise I also found some general writing 'don'ts' that screamed out at me, like lack of pronoun clarification, use of cliche phrases ("face the music"), and using the same phrase over and over in only a few pages time ("torn to pieces"). Additionally, the side story about Marcie (the one with the photo of the girl crouching waiting for the school bus) clearly showed me that the author didn't have a good idea of his own concept. I don't want to spoil the basic premise of how the world works, but if you think about it there's no way she could have been that age waiting for a school bus if you applied the rules of the world to her. And lastly, the way the book ended....is there supposed to be a followup book? I didn't believe so, but it's so unfinished I'm not sure. Perhaps he was going for a bit of both, like 'if this book does well I'll write another, but if not it doesn't matter.' I understand the reasoning of why it ended how it does: because of the way things turned out, the narrator is now in charge and has plenty of things to do with his life. But there's no conclusion whatsoever. The questions that such openness leaves hanging in the air just adds to the already mounting stack of issues with weak writing. Overall, the book had some good ideas, and the gimmick with the photos would have been nice, however the ideas aren't fully formed. With lots of editing and reinforcement of concept, this could have been a good book. Unfortunately, due to the fact that the people working with him on this book didn't bring up or didn't force the author to take a longer look at his numerous weak points, we end up with a book that feels flattened by the author's inability to form and communicate ideas effectively. This book is, sadly, a mess.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies

    This is just one of those books whose hype I don't really "get." I read this years ago when it was newly released, and was thoroughly unimpressed. Upon my second reading of this book, my opinion remains unchanged. A few creepy pictures and some weird people do not a horror tale make, and honestly, that's all the story is. It's a book about stories, and too much attention is focused on the telling of those stories instead of developing the actual plot. As a result, the tale fell flat for me. It wa This is just one of those books whose hype I don't really "get." I read this years ago when it was newly released, and was thoroughly unimpressed. Upon my second reading of this book, my opinion remains unchanged. A few creepy pictures and some weird people do not a horror tale make, and honestly, that's all the story is. It's a book about stories, and too much attention is focused on the telling of those stories instead of developing the actual plot. As a result, the tale fell flat for me. It was too distracting, and it was nowhere as creepy or weird as it touts itself to be. There is a severe lack of character development. The children within the book are presented to us in a way one would display a circus freak. They are defined by their eccentricities, and they are without much personality of their own. In that sense, they really are no better than a circus freak, the way they are shown to us; there is little empathy within the reader for them, they are sidelined. Furthermore, it is slow. The book focuses too much on its own little meta-ness that it just lost me. I had grown bored by the middle of the book, and the latter was truly a pain to suffer through. I just don't get it. It wasn't scary. It was slow and boring. There's some interesting pictures, but come on, we have Google Image Search for a reason, as well as Reddit (/r/creepypasta!). For me, this book was a waste of my time and effort.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Giselle

    This book started with a bang. It was very creepy, exciting and really intriguing, but it all went downhill from there. Once the mystery around the house was explained - which was fairly early and without any nuance - it became a very boring and almost childish story, which I didn't expect at all. One thing I can say I enjoyed was the photographs- they're scattered throughout the book, all black and white and remarkably creepy. They add a nice eery touch to the story and gives it a really unique This book started with a bang. It was very creepy, exciting and really intriguing, but it all went downhill from there. Once the mystery around the house was explained - which was fairly early and without any nuance - it became a very boring and almost childish story, which I didn't expect at all. One thing I can say I enjoyed was the photographs- they're scattered throughout the book, all black and white and remarkably creepy. They add a nice eery touch to the story and gives it a really unique flair. The plot is what I didn't like. After its strong beginning, it fizzles into this bland and predictably dull tale. Don't get me wrong. It's very unique and unconventional so I can see it's appeal. It's also well written and does stem from great creativity, but I found it lacked too much detail and sophistication. The characters, too, fell flat and as a few things went unexplained we were left with scattered holes in the plot. This book is marketed for young adults but definitely feels more juvenile, like a child's fairy tale, which is not what I expected hence leaving me feeling a bit underwhelmed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mohammed Arabey

    هل تستهويك تلك الصور الغريبة..الرهيبة..الأبيض والأسود ذات الطابع المقبض؟ بالأخص التي بها أطفال؟؟ تلك التي صورت وقت كان الأمر مكلفا بحق مما يجعلك تفكر، لماذا؟ هل تعجبك تيمة روايات المدارس التي تضم أولئك الذين ولدوا بقدرات خارقة..او سحرية؟ حسنا، تعال معي وأهلا بك في عالم بيت الأنسة بيرجريني للأطفال الغرباء Read it before Tim Burton Multi-color edition of it.. If you're into creepy old photos, specially those with children, you know..when Taking pictures was really too expensive to just take a creepy on هل تستهويك تلك الصور الغريبة..الرهيبة..الأبيض والأسود ذات الطابع المقبض؟ بالأخص التي بها أطفال؟؟ تلك التي صورت وقت كان الأمر مكلفا بحق مما يجعلك تفكر، لماذا؟ هل تعجبك تيمة روايات المدارس التي تضم أولئك الذين ولدوا بقدرات خارقة..او سحرية؟ حسنا، تعال معي وأهلا بك في عالم بيت الأنسة بيرجريني للأطفال الغرباء Read it before Tim Burton Multi-color edition of it.. If you're into creepy old photos, specially those with children, you know..when Taking pictures was really too expensive to just take a creepy ones.. And If you're into the theme of Schools for Extraordinary talents youth.. Well, so you're Welcome here... Welcome to Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children... Oh and I can't wait to see it with Tim Burton amazing vision. But I feel it's too colorful to the tune of the novel -at least when I saw the trailer and the posters. -------------------------------- جاكوب فتي في السادسة عشر من عمره, يشهد مصرع جده في حادث غامض يسبب له هلاووس ولأن جده كان يروي لجاكوب الصغير حكايات غريبة بصور أغرب عندما كان طفلا, فيخاف عليه والده ان يكون مصيره مخرفا كجده...فيذهب لدكتور نفسي ويقنعه الدكتور بمواجهة تخيلاته فيسافر وأبيه الي جزيرة ما بانجلترا كي يتحقق من ان بيت الايتام الذي عاش به جده بعد الحرب وهو صغير مجرد خيالات وان المكان طبيعيا لاخيال به وهناك يكتشف حقيقة هولاء الاطفال الذين كانوا اصدقاء لجده يوما ما...كما رأهم في الصور, وذلك بين اطلال ما تبقي من بيت الانسه برجريني منذ غارات الحرب العالمية في الخمسينات لن أحرق لك باقي المفاجأت التي ستكتشفها مع جاكوب حول ماضي جده وحقيقة تلك الصور الغريبة التي كانت بحوزته والبقية التي وجدها جاكوب بعد اكثر من 60 عاما منذ ان غادر جده البيت...منذ ان تم ضرب البيت بقذائف الغارات في الحرب A sixteen years old Jacob Portman witness the death of his beloved grandfather..which cause for him nightmares, and delusions.. May be it's just because his grandfather's weird stories and creepy photos of his childhood.. Fearing end up bit loony as people said about his grandfather, he goes to a Psychiatrist.. He convince him to face his fantasies and goes to the place where his grandfather grow up, his old Home/School, just to prove that's all imagination and everything is just normal.. And so, Jacob goes to some Island in UK with his father to explore the place .... but he explore more about those childhood friends of his grandfather, more about the house that destroyed in the WW II.... I won't spoil how he find out everything...just will give you a hint...He'll meet his grandfather old friends....The Children themselves...... ***************************** هي قصة عن الصداقة والعجائب ، نبذ المجتمع للغريب عنه قصة عن تقبل الاخر...وعن الصراع للبقاء كحبكة وقصة أعتقد أن تقييمي لها 3 نجوم او 3 ونص بغض النظر عن تتابعات النهاية والتي كنت انتظر منها المزيد مايشفع للنهاية فعلا هو انها بداية للجزء الثاني..اما ما زاد من تقييمي فهو أمران أولا الاسلوب السينمائي السهل للمؤلف في الوصف بسهولة وبدون ملل سواء للشخصيات, الاماكن, الاحداث وحتي الاكشن كان افضل بكثير من روايات اخري قد تكون اقوي ولكن وصف الاكشن فيها ممل بالنسبه لي اذا ما راجعت اغلب الريفيوهات ستجد ان لدي دائما مشكلة في روايات قوية ولكن الاكشن بها لم يعجبني فمشاهد الصراع قبل النهاية كانت وصفها سينمائي قليل جدا ما يرضيني بحق وان كانت كما قل..احتجت المزيد من الحبكة بجزء النهاية الامر الثاني والاهم هو كيف تم اخراج هذا الكتاب هو بالتأكيد ما زاد تقييمي لربما 4 ونصف "تم حجب النصف لمعرفة ما اذا كانت السلسله نفسها تستحق ام لا اولا قبل الحديث عن اخراج الفني للرواية يجب ذم واستحقار ما يحدث في دور النشر المصرية الذي لا يتناسب مع اسعارهما بخصوص الاوان الطباعة..كدار الشروق في استخصار وضع بروتريهات اروايات نجيب محفوظ ضمن الكتاب كما كان يحدث في مكتبة مصر ودور اخري في رداءة الوان الغلاف او الطباعة الداخلية في هذه الرواية كالصورة السابقة تزدان 15% من صفحاتها بصور غريبة التي تعبر عن احداث الرواية نفسها, علي ورق فاخر جدا لم اجده حتي الان في رواية مصرية ..وبالمناسبة...سعر هذا الكتاب النسخة الورقية منه نفس سعر رواية نادي السيارات التابعة لدار الشروق عاما نسخةالورقية للاسف ليس بها هذه الصفحتين في الصورة السابقة " مختصر اسماء الابطال مع صورهم" والموجودة فقط في النسخة الهاردكفر ولكن النسخة الورقية عامابها جميع الصور الأخري وحتي تلك صور الابطال نفسهم ولكن متفرقة ضمن الاحداث, هذا جعلني في بعض الاحيان يختلط علي بعض الاسماء كما ان بها اضافة حوار مع المؤلف يفجر فيه مفاجأة حقيقة تلك الصور الموجودة بالكتاب....انه بالرغم من انه قد يأتي وقت تشعر ان الصور قام بتصويرها محترف الا ان الصور فعلا هي صور قديمة غير معروف اصحابها وقام ببراعه المؤلف في نسجها في تلك الرواية ولهذا المجهود, مع الطباعة والأخراج الفني الذي يحترم القارئ..مع قصة جيدة فعلا تم منحها هذا التقييم..واتمني ان يكون الجزء القادم افضل ايضا في الحبكة من ذلك خاصا ان النهاية لم ترق لي حبكتها وغير مشجعة كثيرا للبدء في الجزء الثاني The Story, the plot worth 3, 3.5 of 5 Stars...Just if I skip rating the last chapters..which I expected to be stronger.. What may make these last ones okay that it's consider a "new beginning" to the next novel...which I hope it'd be even stronger. Two points made me appreciate the novel more : First the Cinematic way of the story telling, and the ease of describing the action made it a good fun read....although I'm not big fan of long action describing but it was easy here.. The Second is the AMAZING photos and the overall design of the book - I notice that the Hardcover edition even more better with the character photo table too- it was really elegant and creepy.. I suspect first that the pictures were made for the novel but it gave me the creep when I know that it was real photos.. Great work been done, that why I appreciate the novel more ,and gave it another 0.5 points to Gryffindor to the rating... I didn't like the ending chapters much... it's not huge encourage to try book two... But still, sure I will try part 2 soon.. ~~~~~~~~~~ After watching the movie thoughts: It's Great, not all multi color...on the contrary, The shifting in the atmosphere and colors of the scenes was AMAZING.. exactly just how I imagine it. Have mixed feelings about the ending though. just as the book though it's still very different. محمد العربي من 21 مايو 2014 الي 27 مايو 2014 الريفيو في 24 يونيو 2014

  11. 5 out of 5

    Felicia

    This is kinda like uh...a hipster Harry Potter. Not a bad thing! I liked it a lot. There are tons of cool vintage photographs that lend the air of a turn of the century freak show. I loved the world and the vibe though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lola

    Miss Peregrine’s School for Peculiar Children is no horror story. This is precisely why I decided to give this book a go. Horror is my never-go-near genre. It represents for me what Lord Voldemort represents for the students of Hogwarts: infinite nightmares. So when I read that this bestseller steers clear of the nightmarish stuff, I couldn’t have been happier. No creepy, eerie, ominous atmosphere. When you do sense a bit of that, 1- it never lasts too long and 2- it feels so forced that it ends u Miss Peregrine’s School for Peculiar Children is no horror story. This is precisely why I decided to give this book a go. Horror is my never-go-near genre. It represents for me what Lord Voldemort represents for the students of Hogwarts: infinite nightmares. So when I read that this bestseller steers clear of the nightmarish stuff, I couldn’t have been happier. No creepy, eerie, ominous atmosphere. When you do sense a bit of that, 1- it never lasts too long and 2- it feels so forced that it ends up being dull. I’m sorry to say this, but Ransom Riggs should probably work on his skills for terrifying readers, if that’s what he wants to do to us. But I was a happy girl reading this and being completely unaffected by the peculiar children. Sure, they’re sometimes performing gruesome acts, but very rarely. They’re more like superhumans than terrors meant to crawl into your mind and take possession of your thoughts. I actually felt pity for them. They are sentenced by Miss Peregrine to forever relive the same day – in a loop of time. Their bodies don’t age, even if psychologically they feel older and more mature. They are eighty-year-olds with the body of children. Yet, they listen to their headmistress and don’t dare disrupt that loop of time created to shelter them from the dangerous outside world, during World War II. But then Jacob comes along, from the future, and entices them with the wonders of the 21st Century. But who is this young man who is able to time-travel and whose grandfather died under mysterious circumstances? Jacob claims that there’s nothing peculiar about him, but what if there is? It all probably looks very intriguing and unlike any young adult book you’ve read before. But it isn’t. It’s sluggish, the mystery doesn’t last for long, the romance is cringe-worthy and there is absolutely no defined plot. Jacob goes from a place to the other – from A to B and B to A – and it’s very repetitive. I did like the pictures, which are apparently real ones and barely modified. I thought they illustrated the description of the characters well and gave you something to think about. Aside from that, Jacob is a decent protagonist and his narration amusing enough. I wouldn’t say that it’s boring per se, but it’s definitely not what I expected from a bestseller with such a curious premise. I will read the sequel, because the ending takes a new turn that surprised me. Underwhelming, but not unreadable. BD | Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    2.5 stars I wanted to like this way more, and I really tried to. As a huge X-men fan, I kind of went into this book with such high hopes and expectations. The book as a physical copy is done extremely well, the details, the creepy pictures, the way it is written is breathtaking. Sadly the story disappointed me so much. In the last few pages I didn't even care about any of the characters anymore. I really wanted to like this. Was it worth reading ? - I can't say for sure. Will I re-read it? - Unlike 2.5 stars I wanted to like this way more, and I really tried to. As a huge X-men fan, I kind of went into this book with such high hopes and expectations. The book as a physical copy is done extremely well, the details, the creepy pictures, the way it is written is breathtaking. Sadly the story disappointed me so much. In the last few pages I didn't even care about any of the characters anymore. I really wanted to like this. Was it worth reading ? - I can't say for sure. Will I re-read it? - Unlikely. Do I recommend it? - Yes, maybe it works for you.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annalisa

    2.5 stars Have you ever played that game where one person starts a story and stops mid-sentence and the next person in the circle has to pick up the story? That's how reading this book felt, only instead of jumping from disjointed person to person, it jumps from disjointed photograph to photograph. Too bad because it started off fantastic. I loved the writing, the humorous way Riggs has with descriptions, and the old-fashion carny photos were a nice touch. I especially loved the analogy of an orph 2.5 stars Have you ever played that game where one person starts a story and stops mid-sentence and the next person in the circle has to pick up the story? That's how reading this book felt, only instead of jumping from disjointed person to person, it jumps from disjointed photograph to photograph. Too bad because it started off fantastic. I loved the writing, the humorous way Riggs has with descriptions, and the old-fashion carny photos were a nice touch. I especially loved the analogy of an orphaned Jewish boy hiding, not from Nazis, but from monsters because he was peculiar. Fantastic. But then Jacob set off in search of these peculiar children and the story became weak explanations of these old, neglected photos. I didn't believe them. With the whole backdrop of WWII, I couldn't help but think about all the lost Jewish artifacts gone to people whom they didn't belong to and who didn't deserve them and I couldn't help make correlations. What about the real story behind these photographs? What would these people and their lost relatives think of the way Riggs used snapshots that were never meant to be public? Maybe if Riggs had told a fantastic story I couldn't help but believe and love I wouldn't have thought about the lost real lives associated with the pictures, but as it is, I didn't think his story justified them. Some of my other issues: sometimes Riggs relies too heavily on the photographs and fails to give adequate verbal pictures. Like with Emma, whose photographs, one too old and one too young, don't look anything like each other. There isn't any written description of her other than she was hot, but with one of the photographs in in shadow and the other her head turned (neither of which were "hot"), I couldn't visualize her. I also don't think the loop was explained very well. I didn't quite follow how and when the loop restarted each day and what exactly was happening with the fighter jet fireworks night. I wondered for too long whether time inside the loop affected time outside it and I questioned how one was supposed to jump from loop to loop if loops stuck to a 24-hour period. I could have used more explanation about the wights and hollows too. I think I would have liked the story better without the photographs as excuses for it. Riggs has some talent as a writer and I wouldn't be opposed to reading him again, but if he follows this up with a sequel, I probably won't check it out.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    A peculiar reading indeed! This is the first book in the trilogy of the same name than the title of this very book. THE PECULIAR X-MENISH We cling to our fairy tales until the price for believing them becomes too high. This was a book hard to rate, since it provoked some contradictory feelings. I enjoyed a lot the concept of creating a new “world to be discovered” in an era where it’s supposed that everywhere was already explored, along with such unique (for not saying “particulars”) characters A peculiar reading indeed! This is the first book in the trilogy of the same name than the title of this very book. THE PECULIAR X-MENISH We cling to our fairy tales until the price for believing them becomes too high. This was a book hard to rate, since it provoked some contradictory feelings. I enjoyed a lot the concept of creating a new “world to be discovered” in an era where it’s supposed that everywhere was already explored, along with such unique (for not saying “particulars”) characters. However, it was kinda bummer that the story lacks of action, until the very final climax, where even there, you are left in a huge cliffhanger, so not having a real closure in the book was disappointing too. I can understand that this is a trilogy, so we won’t have a definitive closure in the first book, BUT, leaving the book in a cliffhanger, always got you unbalanced. Also, as I commented, the book lacks of action, and while you have it at the final climax of the book, it’s what you can tell as something that intense, that you may expected with such “peculiar” characters, in both sides of good and evil. However, I still am amazed of the level of imagination, developing character totally “peculiar” breaking the boundaries of logic or common sense, that I enjoy a lot, since your real life is limited by logic and common sense without any remedy, but if you’re reading fantasy, you want to be mindblowed, and certainly you find some character with “peculiar” features, so wacky, so astonishing that you have to thank the brain of this author to go beyond. Along with breaking that awful reality of our time that with orbital satélites, there isn’t any place in the world unexplored, so finding again “new places” to explore, it’s such a wonderful treat. And of course… …you have the photographs! Peculiar, odd, spooky, you never know what you’ll find in the next photo! …what an unchallenging life it would be if we always got things right in the first go. So, while I expected a higher overall reading experience in this first book… …the series already proved me that it’s indeed “peculiar”, different than other book series, and yes, I want to continue the journey. So, we’ll see you in the second book in the very near future! P.S. UPDATE (October, 10th, 2016) I already watched the movie adaptation and I liked it a lot. I think the movie has better rhythm and a climax more satisfactory in the sense of action. Also, besides some changes in characters interactions, the movie was designed to work as a stand-alone story, must likely in the chance that it wouldn't be able to adapt the other two books in the series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Val Shameless ⚓️ Steamy Reads ⚓️

    This was amazing and I enjoyed it immensely. I actually grabbed this book because I loved the movie. And I watched this movie because, yes, I love anything fantastical and magical... ...but mostly, I watched it because I adore Eva Green… God, I love her. ...and I will literally watch any movie she’s in. Because, as I said…obsessed. Isn't she fierce? Anystalker, after watching the movie – which I don’t even know why I loved so much, I just did – I really wanted to read the book. Ya’ll know how that This was amazing and I enjoyed it immensely. I actually grabbed this book because I loved the movie. And I watched this movie because, yes, I love anything fantastical and magical... ...but mostly, I watched it because I adore Eva Green… God, I love her. ...and I will literally watch any movie she’s in. Because, as I said…obsessed. Isn't she fierce? Anystalker, after watching the movie – which I don’t even know why I loved so much, I just did – I really wanted to read the book. Ya’ll know how that goes. I’ll be honest though, I didn’t expect to like it as much as the movie. So color me surprised when I did. It’s always dicey with movies and books, no? Most people ALWAYS like the book better; and I usually do too – when I have read the book BEFORE seeing the movie. But, for whatever reason, for me it’s usually a simple matter of which one I ingested first. If I read the book first, I typically always like the book more. Full stop. …However, full transparency, I must admit: most of the time, if I saw the movie first, I have no desire to pick up the book so I never manage to read the book, anyway. In those cases where I HAVE actually grabbed the book post-movie…I typically liked the movie better. Examples of this are The Notebook and A Walk to Remember…so, apparently if it’s a Nicholas Sparks book, I will like the movie better. LOL. Just realizing that now. Le sigh. Anyway, in the case of this movie, I just knew the book would have details the movie didn’t (as is always the case, I know) and I really wanted to know what those details were. Again, full transparency, I actually think seeing the movie first made this book better for me. As I said, I love Eva Green. And I really enjoyed all the other characters and actors from this movie too. So, of course, I was visualizing them as I was reading. Which I really enjoyed. The book was very different than the movie in many ways. The characters Emma and Olive had their peculiarity traded for the movie, apparently. In the book, Emma is the walking furnace and Olive is the floater. As such, the book was obviously missing one of my favorite scenes from the movie: There were some other major differences too, one of the most obvious being the appearance of Miss Peregrine herself. Obviously, she was portrayed differently in the movie than she was in the book: But, I don't care. Right or wrong, I was picturing my Eva throughout my reading adventure. Now, even though it may seem like it's becoming one, I'm not here to do a compare/contrast essay on the book vs the movie, so I will move on from that. I really, really enjoyed Ransom Rigg's writing style. Also, even though this is billed as a "children's book," there was a grittiness to it that sets it apart from most books of its kind. Kind of like Grimm's Red Riding Hood vs Disney's Red Riding Hood. Creepier, bloodier, and more visceral all around. I also really enjoyed the pictures that were strategically placed throughout the book. What a treat to be able to read about characters and then have mysterious pictures of them pop up several pages later. The coolest part is, in the back of the book, Riggs explains how all the pictures are authentic, vintage photographs (that were only mildly retouched in certain cases to depict a peculiarity) which were part of large vintage collections. Be-YOND cool. Also, he talks about how the pictures influenced the story and how his background in film influenced his writing. Pretty MADE to be a movie, no? Thus, super excited about my next read - before I tackle Hollow City - because I just can't wait:

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Every so often a book comes along that is pure magic, and "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" is one such book. Part fantasy, part adventure, part eccentric photo collection, this is a story that will enthrall and enchant teens and adults. Jacob is the sixteen year old narrator, and he is intelligent, funny, realistic and perceptive. He is very close to his secretive grandfather, who used to tell him fantastic tales of his youth, and the children's home where he grew up. These tales wer Every so often a book comes along that is pure magic, and "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" is one such book. Part fantasy, part adventure, part eccentric photo collection, this is a story that will enthrall and enchant teens and adults. Jacob is the sixteen year old narrator, and he is intelligent, funny, realistic and perceptive. He is very close to his secretive grandfather, who used to tell him fantastic tales of his youth, and the children's home where he grew up. These tales were often accompanied by odd old photographs, and these same photographs are included in the book, creating a rich visual record that transports the reader on a magical journey. Jacob believed in the possibility of a magical life because of his grandfather and the tales he told. But as Jacob grows older, he stops believing in magic as his grandfather begins to age and show signs of senility. After the shocking murder of his grandfather, Jacob's life is turned upside down. He sees something unbelievable, something that lends credence to his grandfather's stories, and his parents and the police question his mental stability. In an attempt to help Jacob reconcile what is real from the fantastic, his father takes him to Cairnholm Island off the coast of Wales. Once on the island, Jacob feels the impact of being in a place seemingly out of time and separate from the world. The island seems to hide secrets of its own, its fog providing a curtain between the present and past. But hoping the reality of his grandfather's childhood will allow Jacob to heal, his father permits Jacob to explore the island and the old Home. But what Jacob finds forces him to believe in the magical and fantastic once again. Soon events take a darker turn, as Jacob learns he is being hunted by evil beings for shocking reasons. As Jacob says in the story, "Sometimes you just have to go through a door", and this would make a great theme for the book. Jacob must make frequent leaps of faith in order to decipher his grandfather's cryptic final words. He must find the inner strength to deny the opinions of his parents, the police, and his psychiatrist and follow his heart and his instincts. Taking these chances is like going through a door, never knowing what is on the other side. But every door he goes through brings him closer to his grandfather's secrets, and these secrets come alive (sometimes literally) as Jacob continues his quest. Enthralling, magical, spooky and wonderful, "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" is one of the most original and captivating books I have read in a very long time. Read this!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Hazel (Stay Bookish)

    Seeing this book when I entered the bookstore one time, the peculiar cover truly piqued my curiosity. I didn't buy it that instant though or the time after that and the time after that. Although it was on my "to-read list", I wasn't a big fan of supernatural stories (this is what I assumed the story to be about) and so reading this wasn't one of my top priorities. I knew I had to read it some point in time to finally cross it off the list and when I heard about the Ransom's book signing, I knew Seeing this book when I entered the bookstore one time, the peculiar cover truly piqued my curiosity. I didn't buy it that instant though or the time after that and the time after that. Although it was on my "to-read list", I wasn't a big fan of supernatural stories (this is what I assumed the story to be about) and so reading this wasn't one of my top priorities. I knew I had to read it some point in time to finally cross it off the list and when I heard about the Ransom's book signing, I knew it was the perfect timing. Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children centers on Jacob, a young boy who ever so loved his grandfather, the man who filled his head with endless mysterious yet wondrous and terrible tales of people with amazing power and monsters too. Growing up though, his faith in his grandfather's stories grew into doubt. As an unfortunate tragedy befalls Jacob, he thinks he's lost his mind- his head full of darkness. He thinks the only way to solve his problems would be to go back to where it all started- to where his grandfather started. He finds himself in a bleak island and stumbles into the broken old house where his grandfather used to live, the place that he will find the truth about himself and everything else. From the very start, I was at ease with the way the book was written and was in love with how the author conveyed words. I never knew that such simple sentences could be so haunting and beautiful. The way Jacob's character was portrayed was really good. Even though I usually have a hard time relating to a boy's point of view, I found it easy to relate with Jacob's. I grew to understand his relationship with his grandfather. I grew to understand his curiosity and restlessness, his peculiarity. I even understood his attraction to Emma. Although I enjoyed reading Jacob (I really did, despite the darkness that I feel lurks inside him), my favorite character would be Millard. How awesome is it that he's invisible? And aside that, I found him totally hilarious!! I really did love all the peculiar children. Each were just so unique, not just with their skills but also their persona. Miss Peregrine's is a really amazing book.The setting, the characters, the plot, the photos were weaved together beautifully to create a wonderful, one-of-a-kind story that surely leaves a great impression upon the reader. I wouldn't consider the ending as a cliff-hanger but it was open ended. It does have a sense of moving forward, making you anticipate the next book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Darling

    I did a fun thing last week! I was invited to the Tim Burton handprint ceremony in Hollywood and a screening of the MISS PEREGRINE movie. More photos and event recap on the blog. http://www.themidnightgarden.net/2016... Winona Ryder was there, and it was kind of strange to see her again after seeing STRANGER THINGS so recently, heh. I really enjoyed the film, btw! And now I must acquire a copy of the book to read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Elyse

    Audiobook......and Physical Book!!! BOTH!!! Wow...I had no idea what I was missing!!!! I think it's wonderful!!! The AUDIOBOOK made the difference for 'me'. I've had the hard copy for a couple of years--but kept putting it off. The print is small in the book - and jumping around looking at the pictures without having read the story didn't mean anything 'yet'. NOW THEY DO! So, I started with the AUDIOBOOK. I can't imagine anybody not being drawn into the story immediately. I was almost in tears b Audiobook......and Physical Book!!! BOTH!!! Wow...I had no idea what I was missing!!!! I think it's wonderful!!! The AUDIOBOOK made the difference for 'me'. I've had the hard copy for a couple of years--but kept putting it off. The print is small in the book - and jumping around looking at the pictures without having read the story didn't mean anything 'yet'. NOW THEY DO! So, I started with the AUDIOBOOK. I can't imagine anybody not being drawn into the story immediately. I was almost in tears before the first hour of listening. I loved Jacob right off the bat - loved his voice ( the narrator was ADORABLE & WHOLESOME). I was laughing. I was INTERESTED! I was intrigued. I was moved. I was sad. I was hopeful. I WAS IN STORYLAND HEAVEN! I couldn't wait to see what would come next! With the vintage photographs in the book - the wild stories that grandpa Abe told Jacobs- Jacob's silly job - his best friend - his mom & dad - and ALL THE PECULIARS..... This book was Perfectly Peculiar for me!!!!! I'm going to continue with the series. Note: something might be happening to my brain (brain loss too?) ....in a good way..... but I am enjoying this whimsical crazy nutty storytelling more NOW at age 65 than I ever remember as a child. Then again, I don't remember anyone ever introducing or reading fantasy type stories to me as a child. I have never read a HARRY POTTER BOOK or SEEN the movies - sure they were not for me.... BUT.... ARE THEY on AUDIOBOOK? - because if they are as enjoyable as this one was - WITH HEART & LOVE FEELINGS TOO.... I just might be a sucker for them after all!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    WARNING: This review may contain excessive (and possibly incorrect) use of the Welsh language. Diolch. Initial Final Page Thoughts. Woaaah. Also, the sequel is going to be bendigedig! High Points. TERRIFYING. Originality. Kick-ass taids! Creepy but adorable children. Fairy tales… or are they? WW11. Cymru. Culture and heritage. Time-travel. Crumbling old houses. League of Gentlemen-esque locals. Ghosts, spooks and fire-throwers, OH MY. And, my favourite part of this book, the beautiful photos. Looki WARNING: This review may contain excessive (and possibly incorrect) use of the Welsh language. Diolch. Initial Final Page Thoughts. Woaaah. Also, the sequel is going to be bendigedig! High Points. TERRIFYING. Originality. Kick-ass taids! Creepy but adorable children. Fairy tales… or are they? WW11. Cymru. Culture and heritage. Time-travel. Crumbling old houses. League of Gentlemen-esque locals. Ghosts, spooks and fire-throwers, OH MY. And, my favourite part of this book, the beautiful photos. Looking at them reminded me of the time where my grandma and I spent a rainy day in summer going through old snapshots. Everything looks better in sepia, right? Low points. I don’t mean to belittle Jacob (the MC) or challenge his intelligence, or any other sixteen year old's intelligence for that matter, but I have never met a sixteen year old boy who would use the word “torpor” in a sentence. Unless of course it was 'Um... what does 'torpor' mean?!' I’m supposed to be educated (pahaha)and there were some moments where I had to balance an Oxford Dictionary on my knee! There were quite big chunks of descriptive paragraphs that, although beautifully written, I found it difficult to believe that Jake would really say things like that. And speaking of outrageous horror that filled my being with cringe…. The love story? WHAT THE HECK. Just no… but more on this later. Hero. Besides his flowery language and horrifying taste in women, I liked Jacob. He was adventurous (because even though I would’ve thought it was cool, there is no way on earth I would have gone into that house. If I was the MC in this story, it would have been a very short book that would have ended with me sulking in the airport while my dad yelled “And you couldn’t have realised you were a wimp before we travelled a million miles to an island in the middle of NOWHERE?”), he is funny and he has the right amount of “Um, OK this is bizarre” moments that a lot of YA heroes seem to forgo in order to be all macho. But, there were times that I didn’t really like him and didn’t agree with the decisions that he made throughout the novel. And also, he’s a pretty crappy son/grandson. Just sayin’. BUT, I still love love loved this book and I think that Jake will be a much better hero in the inevitable sequel and I will be more inclined to root for him and be ready with fist-pumps and pom poms and the occasional high kick. Love Interest. I.. I just can’t deal with this. I honestly can’t think of any situation where this love affair would be acceptable. Even the gooiest of romantics would find this stomach-churning. It’s just weird. I’ll let you make up your own decision. Baddie. Holy guacamole. This book is soooo creepy and the baddie(s) do NOT disappoint. It was only in the final few chapters that we really got to meet them and find out about what they were after but argh, they were scary. I know I keep mentioning the sequel… but I really think with a little more detail and development these guys are going to make themselves known…. In my nightmares. Theme Tune. See My Friends- The Kinks. I would like to see Jake’s friends. They are the coolest kids ever. Kind of like if the lost boys (the originals… not the mulletted vamps) joined forces with the X-Men. YEAH. It’s that cool. Angst. 7/10. It would probably be a 15 if I included the angst I felt every time the love sauntered on the page, but this isn’t about me. This is about Jake and peculiar children who deal with angst in different and better ways than I. There are a lot of sadness and bitter-sweet ‘what ifs?’ in this book that made my heart hurt, especially concerning Abe, the sweetest grandpa ever. One of the things I loved most was the subtlety of Riggs’ writing… the true horrors of the book are only alluded to and allowing you to fill in the blanks. There is definitely a melancholic feel to this book and I felt like I was watching an old movie where you know that there isn’t going to be a happy ending. That may sound like a bad thing…. But it’s not at all, because the old movies are the best ones, right? Recommended For. People who are fascinated by old photos and could spend full days just looking through them. People who don’t mind being completely creeped out by their reading material. People who love the 1940s. People who love time travel in books. People who don’t really care for time-travel because it hurts their head to try and figure it all out (like moi), it’s really easy to understand and it’s exciting! People who have always wondered what happens behind the doors of the shambling mansions that loom on stormy Welsh mountains. People who don’t mind love stories that would be perfectly at home in the pages of a book written by Virginia Andrews. People who don’t experience involuntary muscle spasms whenever the words ‘bog’ and ‘man’ are mentioned in the same sentence….cheers for that Seamus Heaney *twitch*. People who are patiently waiting for their own peculiar powers to kick in… any day now, Jo. Any day. I hear that Fox has bought the film rights to this and people are screaming for Tim Burton to direct. But..I'm putting my foot down. Guillermo del Toro is the ONLY person who could do this film justice. That man knows how to deal with creepy orphans who are also adorable.... but mostly terrifying. I might write a letter to Mr Riggs suggesting this while I slurp a panad and eat rarebit and wonder what the heck happened to Gavin Henson's skin tone/career/life while listening to Aled Jones. You can also read the review for this book and others along with a whole lot of other exciting stuff on my blog here.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Darth J

    So I bought the trilogy in hardcover at B&N, hoping to dive into this series head first. It came with a bunch of cards: So I'm a little disappointed that the cover of the book doesn't match up with the tone for much of it. It was written too modern and I felt like it was a mismatch to have such classic photography throughout. I kept looking back to the cover while reading like: Second most of the characters are just plain boring. Jacob has the gift of seeing monsters... lame. He's a pretty fla So I bought the trilogy in hardcover at B&N, hoping to dive into this series head first. It came with a bunch of cards: So I'm a little disappointed that the cover of the book doesn't match up with the tone for much of it. It was written too modern and I felt like it was a mismatch to have such classic photography throughout. I kept looking back to the cover while reading like: Second most of the characters are just plain boring. Jacob has the gift of seeing monsters... lame. He's a pretty flat character to begin with, despite having a backstory. He falls in ~like~ with his grandpa's old gf who can conjure flames in her hands, but I think that's pretty squicky. There's a boy who can make golems with animal hearts, and a girl who can animate topiarys, but all in all the kids are dry and dull. Now, Miss Peregrine was an interesting old broad (yes, I'm using old timey slang, deal with it). She can turn into a bird and can manipulate time. Also, was I the only one who saw her as Dame Maggie Smith the whole book? All in all, not a great book but not a bad one either. I've heard the second and third ones are better and since I already plunked down the cash for them, I'm going to go ahead and read them.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kai

    “We cling to our fairy tales until the price for believing in them becomes too high.” A boy, a death, a monster in the shadows. Everything leads to a far-away island with an abandoned orphanage. Here it is for the boy to uncover secrets and threats he couldn't have possibly imagined. What took me so long to read this? Probably the fact that someone else snatched this book away from me whenever I was at the library. Rigg's first novel was fascinating and had an intriguing dark twist to it. Many of th “We cling to our fairy tales until the price for believing in them becomes too high.” A boy, a death, a monster in the shadows. Everything leads to a far-away island with an abandoned orphanage. Here it is for the boy to uncover secrets and threats he couldn't have possibly imagined. What took me so long to read this? Probably the fact that someone else snatched this book away from me whenever I was at the library. Rigg's first novel was fascinating and had an intriguing dark twist to it. Many of the added photographs were haunting and unsettling, making me dread that I was reading this so late at night. On the other hand, this novel had its fair share of flaws. Many of the characters are not as exciting and real as I would have liked them to be. Especially Miss Peregrine lost her charm after a few pages. There's just a lack of character depth, especially when it comes to the main character and Emma. Exactly the same criteria go for the atmosphere of the whole novel. Title, cover and pictures promise an old, weird, even sinister mood, something like Shutter Island or AHS: Asylum. At least that's what I expected. Here we go again: Insta-love. This book is a perfect and probably also the weirdest example. (view spoiler)[Falling in love with your Granddad's former lover?! Nope. (hide spoiler)] Miss Peregrines Home for Peculiar Children also had a lot of predictability to it. Nevertheless, it's the first in what seems to be a promising series and I'll make sure to read the sequels. Find more of my books on Instagram

  24. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    It was...fine? I liked the inclusion of old, weird photographs throughout the book, especially the way they were placed - you would read an offhand description of something odd, turn the page, and there was the photo showing exactly that. I liked that part, and the photos were always a pleasant surprise, even though I spent way too much time trying to figure out how they had been faked. But there were just too many stumbling blocks for me to really enjoy this book. The biggest and most obvious is It was...fine? I liked the inclusion of old, weird photographs throughout the book, especially the way they were placed - you would read an offhand description of something odd, turn the page, and there was the photo showing exactly that. I liked that part, and the photos were always a pleasant surprise, even though I spent way too much time trying to figure out how they had been faked. But there were just too many stumbling blocks for me to really enjoy this book. The biggest and most obvious issue is the whole concept of "time loops", which enable the peculiar children of the novel to remain hidden from the larger world. Time travel as a narrative device is extremely tricky to pull off, because of all the potential plot holes that spring up - it's expert-level, black diamond stuff, and Riggs isn't at the level where he can successfully navigate it. And Jacob, our hero, was a problem. He had almost no discernible personality (probably because he's intended to be a stand-in for the reader, so we can project our own personalities onto him) and had wildly inconsistent characterization. It starts out really well, because in the early chapters, we see Jacob dealing with the fact that he witnessed his grandfather's violent death. Riggs shows us how damaging that can be, and doesn't spare us the details of Jacob's PTSD (one detail I especially loved: for a few months, Jacob can only sleep in a pile of blankets in the laundry room, because it's the only room in his house "with no windows and also a door that locked from the inside"). I was really excited that Riggs was doing this, because it's very rare for YA supernatural adventure lit like this to acknowledge that, hey, regular exposure to stuff like this is actually really really traumatizing. But then Jacob's anxiety and PTSD just kind of...go away. Throughout the story, we see him in confined spaces, witnessing violence, and encountering the same kind of terrifying situations that sent him into intensive therapy at the beginning of the book, and he just brushes them off like it's no big deal. It was like Riggs started out thinking he was going to realistically depict the traumatic aftermath of violent, scary situations, but then got bored and decided to just ignore all of Jacob's previously-established mental issues. But honestly, the biggest problem I had was this: I wanted to read this same story, but from another character's perspective and written by another author. Okay, so because Jacob is a minor, his father accompanies him to the island and then just hangs around in the background, quietly having a total mental breakdown that Jacob can't be bothered to notice. Because here's what's so interesting to me: while Jacob has mostly positive memories of his grandfather, the dad remembers him as an emotionally distant father who was never around and may have been having an affair. Then Jacob learns that, no, his grandpa was always traveling because he was busy hunting demons. Fine, but imagine this story from the dad's perspective: an adult man, dealing with the death of his father, learns that he had an entire separate life as a hunter of monsters, and the man has to resume the work his father started while also working through their complicated relationship. Forget the precocious Harry Potter-lite teenage hero; I wanted to read an emotionally complex story of a man reconciling his relationship with his complicated father while also learning to hunt demons. Long story short: this is the first book in a trilogy, but I have no interest in continuing the series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    My grandfather had described it a hundred times, but in his stories the house was always a bright, happy place—big and rambling, yes, but full of light and laughter. What stood before me now was no refuge from monsters, but a monster itself, staring down from its perch on the hill with vacant hunger. Trees burst forth from broken windows and skins of scabrous vine gnawed at the walls like antibodies attacking a virus—as if nature itself had waged war against it—but the house seemed unkillable, My grandfather had described it a hundred times, but in his stories the house was always a bright, happy place—big and rambling, yes, but full of light and laughter. What stood before me now was no refuge from monsters, but a monster itself, staring down from its perch on the hill with vacant hunger. Trees burst forth from broken windows and skins of scabrous vine gnawed at the walls like antibodies attacking a virus—as if nature itself had waged war against it—but the house seemed unkillable, resolutely upright despite the wrongness of its angles and the jagged teeth of sky visible through sections of collapsed roof. Jacob Porter (I leave out his middle name, which you can enjoy discovering on your own) had been enthralled by his grandfather Abe’s magical, if frightening, tales of his past, horrifying monsters in pursuit and a safe haven of a special school in Wales for those fortunate enough to escape. When being the brunt of derision at school was too much, Jacob cast aside his faith in his grandfather’s stories, and assumed the consensus view that Gramps had been speaking metaphorically, about having been chased out of Poland by the Nazis. But when Jacob is a teen, and his grandfather is brutally murdered, he has cause to reconsider. Ransom Riggs - from The Columbus Dispatch There is something both appealing and frightening about old photographs. In our apartment when I was a kid we had a book with photos from the Civil War. The pages were in less than pristine shape, but there were occasional pages that were well preserved, and on which the images were clear. It seemed impossible that people who had lived almost a hundred years before could seem so real, even in black and white, as if they might step out of the pages into our living room. It was similar in seeing photographs of my parents and their seldom, if ever, seen relations. I only knew my parents as middle-aged or elderly. Photos of them as young seemed, somehow, unreal. Nah, they never looked like that. I often wondered who the imposter was in a photo that was supposed to be my father, in full work gear, in front of a locomotive, sans moustache. Was he really my father, and if he was, who was that guy falling asleep in the recliner in the living room? Emma Bloom from The Peculiar Children Wikia The offbeat collection of fascinating photographs included in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children is one of the things that makes this book stand out. Author Ransom Riggs has a great fondness for old photos. He had originally intended to use them to make a picture book, but was encouraged to expand on what he had and build a novel out of them. He did, amassing quite the collection, trolling estate and yard sales, broadening his scope and finding unexpected notions and plot direction from the new images he found. He particularly enjoyed spotting photos that were odd. One appears to show a girl floating above the ground, another an invisible person in a suit, another still a young man covered in bees. The book contains about fifty of these curious images. They lend a sense of both antiquity and strangeness. Many are downright creepy. And that is a good, sometimes a wonderful thing, particularly when the images relate to the darker elements in the story. Riggs selected a lineup of these oddities and from them constructed a tale, an explanation for what the photos purport to show. The result is magical, a triumph of imagination, and a rip-roaring read. It was just a casual hobby, nothing serious, but I noticed that among the photos I found, the strangest and most intriguing ones were always of children. I began to wonder who some of these strange-looking children had been—what their stories were—but the photos were old and anonymous and there was no way to know. So I thought: If I can’t know their real stories, I’ll make them up…Sometimes I’d find a new photo that just demanded to be included in the story, and I’d find a way to work it in; other times I’d look for a certain type of photo to fit a story idea. When he begins to dig into the meaning behind a somewhat inscrutable letter his grandfather had left him, Jacob begins on the road to discovery. His quest leads him, accompanied by his amateur ornithologist father, to an island off the coast of Wales. I am not giving anything away by letting you know that on this island he finds a very special place and some very unusual people. Miss Peregrine from The Peculiar Children Wikia I had inconsistent reactions to the book. At first I was smitten. What a great idea! How beautifully realized! It offered the same sort of tingle I had when reading the first Harry Potter. Later, I felt that the story-telling relied on too many tropes. Oddities-thrown-together-to-cope-in-a-hostile-world, for example. It is no stretch to see close links to, say, X-men, or The Harry Potter series, or even, in a more adult realm, the sideshow performers of Geek Love. Then Tthere is the portal to another place. Think the wardrobe of Narnia fame or John Carter finding a magical route to Barsoom. Stargates and wormholes are rampant in sci-fi these days, as are parallel dimension tales, (The Matrix series pops to mind) and there is always the familiar story of one Dorothy Gale to show the way as well. So, a well-worn path. On the other hand, writers use tropes because they serve a story-telling purpose. What matters more is whether they use well the familiar tools at hand. And they are handled pretty well here. Jacob is a sympathetic lead. Peregrine is a familiar person in charge, the type who is courageous and caring, despite presenting what can seem a severe façade. The crew of peculiars is perfectly fine. And Riggs has come up with a particularly nifty explanation and form for his other world. What Jacob finds Stepping from one world into another, particularly for teens, is usually about leaving the nest and seeing the real world for the first time, whether this is about sexuality, fairness, conflict, truth, or all of the above. Growing up, coming of age is happening. Jacob’s hormones are stretched a bit here, so we can check that box. Also, he gets to see some of the reality of what his life pre-Peregrine featured. What were the adults with whom he has interacted all his life really like when seen through his newly acquired perspective? Can our character grow sufficiently to take on adult responsibilities, make adult decisions? You betcha. In A Conversation with Ransom Riggs, an extra section at the back of my Peregrine volume, Riggs says One of the themes of Miss Peregrine, and I think of any novel that involves the discovery of a secret world, is awakening—the protagonist’s awakening to an awesome and wonderful and, in some ways, terrible reality he scarcely could have imagined before, but that was right under his nose all along. At the end of Miss Peregrine, Jacob writes that his life was never ordinary, but he “had simply failed to notice how extraordinary it was.” Noticing the extraordinariness of the world is one of Emerson’s major themes. Again, from Nature: “If the stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore, and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown. Emerson (Ralph Waldo, not Keith) is referenced several times here. In fact Emerson was much more in the book in earlier versions. Riggs says Emerson often speaks of the possibility of fantastic things that exist just out of view, and many of his most famous quotes almost seem to refer directly to the peculiar children. Riggs offers a mystery, and the clues that Jacob and the reader are challenged to interpret in order to figure out what is going on. And there is magic. The powers of the peculiar children are certainly fun, but not spectacular, overall. A bit of fire control, levitation, super strength, invisibility. A few stand out. One boy has a close relationship with the apian world. Another has a gift for animating the inanimate. A girl can make plants grow very, very fast. One girl has an unexpected way of eating. And of course Peregrine has a few nifty tricks up her wing. The underlying conflict, mirroring the war in the world when the school was founded, (WW II) offers some pretty scary baddies, wights and hollowghasts, the origin story of which called to mind for me Tolkien’s Gollum. The ongoing fear, chase, and battle cycle is fun, generating the needed tension and keeping things moving along. Peculiars - from the film I did not like that dad was portrayed as a dimwit. Not that he needed to be heroic, but he seemed far too lacking in strength and perception for my taste. And then there are the changes made for the film. This review was posted before the film was released, so I can refer only to what I have read, and not to what I have actually seen. I reserve the right to modify once I have seen the movie. I am not thrilled that the film conflates two girls into one. I do understand that changes are typically made when translating a book to the cinematic medium. My objection is a small one. And while I expect to quite enjoy the otherworldly looking and compelling Eva Green as Peregrine, I imagined an older bird in the role. Getting the very peculiar Tim Burton as director is an amazing coup. Whatever changes have been made, I expect the film to be enchanting and wonderfully entertaining. The author writes that this book, like the first Harry Potter, is meant to introduce his characters and his world to readers. It is in the second book in the series, Hollow City, that we can expect to enter that world and experience it more fully. I cannot speak to that one, as I have not yet read it. But I very much want to be kept in the loop for how this series unfolds. Peculiar may not have quite the rich dazzle of the Harry Potter books, but that is a pretty high bar by which to measure any YA series. It is enough that the first one had a particularly fun hook, and was a very enjoyable read, with engaging characters, a good bit of action, some mystery, some surprises and a lot of human, and maybe not-so-human connection. I suppose the only thing that would really be peculiar would be if anyone was not interested in checking this out. Review posted - 9/30/16 Publication date – 6/7/11 =============================EXTRA STUFF Links to the author’s personal, Twitter, Instagram, and FB pages Riggs made the trailer for this, his first novel, after traveling to Belgium and Luxembourg looking for the ruined house of his imagination . The house he selected (shown in the review) is in Belgium. The Peculiar Children Wikia offers a cornucopia of information about the book and the series ‘Miss Peregrine’ and Tim Burton: The Making of a Film Fable - By Mekado Murphy - SEPT. 23, 2016 The Facebook Page for the movie A fun fan-site A fake travel agency site for Cairnholm Island Check out the Calmgrove site for a nifty take on where the real Cairnholm might be , and its significance

  26. 4 out of 5

    Fabian

    Boo...!! The dude's a photography collector not a novelist. Very disappointed not only in reading this nicely-packaged "novel", but to learn that Tim Burton is directing its celluloid equivalent. GAG. Will someone use good novel material already! After my time with it--in which the reader silently prays that more photos will be included, less prose--I am left like a kitten rolled around in thorns. Too many to pick at, I guess I find the biggest fault (a biggie) in the inconsistency of voice. The n Boo...!! The dude's a photography collector not a novelist. Very disappointed not only in reading this nicely-packaged "novel", but to learn that Tim Burton is directing its celluloid equivalent. GAG. Will someone use good novel material already! After my time with it--in which the reader silently prays that more photos will be included, less prose--I am left like a kitten rolled around in thorns. Too many to pick at, I guess I find the biggest fault (a biggie) in the inconsistency of voice. The narrator... is he modern? youthful? He goes to the library because although he lives in modern times he has no internet, and he says stuff like "unreasonably expensive Adirondack", & "Ricky, whose car cost less than my monthly allowance at age 12" (what a fucking jackass, this douche!). Also, describes something as a "David Lynch nightmare", says his father gets an "ornithology boner" when he figures that he can con the parental to follow him in some insipid self-appointed voyage to an English isle, cuz, you know, the guy is rich and the father is a scientist. One last one: "Sisyphean suicide cult." Puh-lease. This is the main problem, the trunk of the narrative structure, & its faulty as fuck. Suddenly, a lighthouse appears for the action to take place in. Suddenly, the X-men seem less fantastical than these group of misfits (none of them with original powers, mind you). The titular character is a Hitchcock figure-meets-Nanny McPhee concoction which possesses zero personality. It is super inconsistent, super lame, and what's up with the old children talking with modern lingo? Just bad. But the pictures, yeah. Scan through those. Lastly, "Miss Peregrine's" has that uncomfortably modern attribute, an a-ha moment very early on when the reader realizes that he's been had: for he's treated not like a reader here, but as a book CONSUMER. A CONSUMER of books. Thanks you tons, marketing!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Reading Corner

    I still have mixed feelings about this book and I can't really make my mind up on the rating so I've decided on 3 stars.The book was sort of all over the place and gives a false image.I naively presumed that the novel would be creepy from it's cover and title but it definitely wasn't.Although,the pictures themselves appear creepy and sinister, the story is not. For me,the pictures were the best part as they're gripping and alluring but the story is awkwardly written around them and most of the pi I still have mixed feelings about this book and I can't really make my mind up on the rating so I've decided on 3 stars.The book was sort of all over the place and gives a false image.I naively presumed that the novel would be creepy from it's cover and title but it definitely wasn't.Although,the pictures themselves appear creepy and sinister, the story is not. For me,the pictures were the best part as they're gripping and alluring but the story is awkwardly written around them and most of the pictures vaguely meet the book's descriptions.The pictures are also introduced badly,like the characters are just randomly like "Oh and I have a picture in my pocket of that time..."I think it would have been better if they were slotted in alongside a quick reference to them. The plot itself is quite interesting, especially the time loops and wights but other elements fail the novel.The start is by far the most entertaining especially the opening scene with Grandpa Portman which is slightly creepy and reels you in.I also enjoyed the first few chapters where Jacob is trying to find the peculiar children as there's a lingering mystery about what happened to them or where they are. One of the biggest downfalls for this book was the characters.They lacked so much, like complexity and development and as a result I didn't care for any of them.Also,the relationship between Emma and Jacob was disgustingly weird and I hated it so much.(view spoiler)[Emma was an old woman(at least 80) and had previously romanced Jacob's grandfather but that didn't stop either of them from getting together.Also, all of the characters were pretty old but still acted like children?Like I know they were stuck in children's bodies but still, should they not have matured at least to the level of a 20 year old. (hide spoiler)] I loved the pictures, despite their irrelevance at times and weak links and I mostly enjoyed the story.However, the characters really needed work and I found the end slightly confusing to comprehend what was going on and it dragged on.I hope the next book is better.

  28. 5 out of 5

    °°°·.°·..·°¯°·._.· ʜᴇʟᴇɴ Ροζουλί Εωσφόρος ·._.·°¯°·.·° .·°°° ★·.·´¯`·.·★ Ⓥⓔⓡⓝⓤⓢ Ⓟⓞⓡⓣⓘⓣⓞⓡ Ⓐⓡⓒⓐⓝⓤⓢ Ταμετούρο Αμ

    Ένα παράξενα συγκινητικό βιβλίο που πραγματεύεται μια ιστορία φαντασίας με τόσο όμορφο τροπο που εύχεσαι να ειναι αληθινή. Σε όλο το βιβλίο κυρίαρχο συναίσθημα η αγάπη που κινεί τα νήματα και κάνει τις αποφάσεις ζωής ή θανάτου να μοιάζουν απίστευτα εύκολες και αναπόδραστες. Η αφοσίωση και η πίστη σε αξίες ξεπερνάει κάθε φαντασία και μαγεύει πραγματικά, με τροπο απλό και τραγικά αληθινό. Η αγωνία και η ένταση κυριαρχούν και επιβάλλουν τη δίκη τους τροπή στα γεγονότα που δεν ειναι σχεδόν ποτέ αναμ Ένα παράξενα συγκινητικό βιβλίο που πραγματεύεται μια ιστορία φαντασίας με τόσο όμορφο τροπο που εύχεσαι να ειναι αληθινή. Σε όλο το βιβλίο κυρίαρχο συναίσθημα η αγάπη που κινεί τα νήματα και κάνει τις αποφάσεις ζωής ή θανάτου να μοιάζουν απίστευτα εύκολες και αναπόδραστες. Η αφοσίωση και η πίστη σε αξίες ξεπερνάει κάθε φαντασία και μαγεύει πραγματικά, με τροπο απλό και τραγικά αληθινό. Η αγωνία και η ένταση κυριαρχούν και επιβάλλουν τη δίκη τους τροπή στα γεγονότα που δεν ειναι σχεδόν ποτέ αναμενόμενα. Μια σειρά αποκαλύψεων εντυπωσιάζει τον αναγνώστη και ως την τελευταία σελίδα υπάρχει προσμονή και ελπίδα σωτηρίας για τον κόσμο των ασυνήθιστων πνευμάτων - των ξεχωριστών παιδιών της μις Πέρεγκριν που τόσο έξοχα κερδίζουν τις καρδιές των συνηθισμένων ανθρώπων!! Καλή ανάγνωση! Πολλούς ασπασμούς!

  29. 4 out of 5

    J.L. Sutton

    Mystery begets mystery as the world of Miss Peregrine and her orphanage for peculiar children takes shadowy shape. I was immediately intrigued by how the story unfolds (through vintage photographs). The atmosphere works nicely with our protagonist's search for answers on a remote island off the coast of Wales where most of the action takes place. After a beginning (which quickly drew me in), it took some time for me to get caught up in the story again. It was a fun read. The ending left plenty o Mystery begets mystery as the world of Miss Peregrine and her orphanage for peculiar children takes shadowy shape. I was immediately intrigued by how the story unfolds (through vintage photographs). The atmosphere works nicely with our protagonist's search for answers on a remote island off the coast of Wales where most of the action takes place. After a beginning (which quickly drew me in), it took some time for me to get caught up in the story again. It was a fun read. The ending left plenty of mystery (maybe a bit too much), but I enjoyed the story!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chris Horsefield

    Young Jacob Portman was close to his grandfather, loving the stories his grandfather told of his childhood in Wales - the magically beautiful house, the other children ... and that they were all "peculiar." One could levitate; one was invisible, others had other talents. Jacob believed these stories until he was bullied about them at school when he was about 7, then announced he no longer believed in them and his grandfather never brought it up again. However, when Jacob is 16 he finds his grandf Young Jacob Portman was close to his grandfather, loving the stories his grandfather told of his childhood in Wales - the magically beautiful house, the other children ... and that they were all "peculiar." One could levitate; one was invisible, others had other talents. Jacob believed these stories until he was bullied about them at school when he was about 7, then announced he no longer believed in them and his grandfather never brought it up again. However, when Jacob is 16 he finds his grandfather horribly murdered - and sees something in the forest that haunts him. An evil-looking creature, just like those his grandfather used to describe from his youth - the monsters that drove Grandpa Portman from his home. Unable to resolve his feelings of guilt and grief, Jacob and his father travel to Wales to try to find the children's home, in hopes that finding it and talking to people from his grandfather's past he will be able to finally resolve his feelings. However, once in the small town on a Welsh island, few people know what he is talking about - finally he finds someone who has heard of the house and gives him directions, but he finds only a run-down, bombed out house that was apparently destroyed in World War II. While looking around, however, he finds a truck of pictures, which he shoves down the stairs in order to break into it. The floor actually breaks and the trunk falls into the basement, and while down there he hears the voices ... of children ... What happens next .. you'll have to find out for yourself. "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" is an amazing piece of magical reality, however, and I don't think you will end up being disappointed in reading it. One unusual thing about this book is the use of pictures throughout - something that isn't seen much in fiction anymore. These pictures document some of the people in the book. I highly recommend it and hope you will take my advice and buy this book - the sooner the better!

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